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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
. James B. Post. Brigade loss: k, 18; w, 192; m, 237 = 447. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Marsena R. Patrick: 21st N. Y., Col. William F. Rogers; 23d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Nirom M. Crane; 35th N. Y., Col. Newton B. Lord; 80th N. Y. (20th Militia), Col. George W. Pratt (mn w), Lieut.-Col. Theodore B. Gates. Brigade loss: k, 56; w, 334; m, 178 = 568. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Gibbon: 2d Wis., Col. Edgar O'Connor (k), Lieut.-Col. Lucius Fairchild; 6th Wis., Col. Lysander Cutler (w), Lieut.-Col. Edward S. Bragg; 7th Wis., Col. William W. Robinson (w), Lieut.-Col. Charles A. Hamilton (w), Lieut.-Col. Lucius Fairchild; 19th Ind., Col. Solomon Meredith. Brigade loss: k, 148; w, 626; m, 120 = 894. Artillery, 1st N. H., Capt. George A. Gerrish (c), Lieut. Frederick M. Edgell; D, 1st R. I., Capt. J. Albert Monroe; L, 1st N. Y., Capt. John A. Reynolds; B, 4th U. S., Capt. Joseph B. Campbell. Artillery loss: k, 7; w, 25; m, 14 = 46. Second division, Brig.-Gen. James B. Ricketts. First Brig
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
ding, a natural object, was named Shiloh, after a church, by his antagonist. Rosecrans called his first great fight with Bragg, the battle of Stone River, while Bragg named it after Murfreesboro‘, a village. So McClellan's battle of the ChickahomiBragg named it after Murfreesboro‘, a village. So McClellan's battle of the Chickahominy, Gaines's Mill.--Editors. a little river, was with Lee the battle of Cold Harbor, a tavern. The Federals speak of the battle of Pea Ridge, of the Ozark range of mountains, and the Confederates call it after Elk Horn, a country inn. The Union ern men had met in the 23d and 28th Georgia regiments men as brave as themselves and far more advantageously posted. Colonel Bragg, of the 6th Wisconsin, says in his report: We sat down in the dark to wait another attack, but the enemy was no more the day,--Meade, Hatch, Cox, Willcox, Scammon, Crook, Gibbon, Ewing, Gallagher, Magilton, Phelps, White, Jackson, Callis, Bragg, and others. In regard to the casualties of the opposing forces, the losses in killed and wounded were greater on the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Forcing Fox's Gap and Turner's Gap. (search)
aged and were supported by the leading regiments, while our guns moved forward on the turnpike until within range of the enemy's guns which were firing on our column from the top of the gorge, when they opened with good effect. My men steadily advanced on the enemy posted in the woods and behind stone-walls, driving him before them until he was reenforced by three additional regiments, making five in all opposed to us. Seeing we were likely to be outflanked on our right, I directed Lieutenant-Colonel Bragg, of the 6th Wisconsin, to enter the wood on his right and deploy his regiment on the right of the 7th. This was successfully accomplished, while the 19th Indiana, supported by the 2d Wisconsin, deployed, and, swinging around parallel to the turnpike, took the enemy in the flank. Thus the fight continued till long after dark, Stewart using his guns with good effect over the heads of our own men. My men, with their ammunition nearly exhausted, held all the ground they had taken. . .
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
arsena R. Patrick: 21st N. Y., Col. William F. Rogers; 23d N. Y., Col. Henry C. Hoffman; 35th N. Y., Col. Newton B. Lord; 80th N. Y. (20th Militia), Lieut.-Col. Theodore B. Gates. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 3; w, 19; m, 1 == 23. Antietam, k, 30; w, 187; mn, 17 == 234. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Gibbon: 19th Ind., Col. Solomon Meredith, Lieut.-Col. Alois 0. Bachman (k), Capt. William W. Dudley: 2d Wis., Col. Lucius Fairchild, Lieut.-Col. Thomas S. Allen (w); 6th Wis., Lieut.-Col. Edward S. Bragg (w), Maj. Rufus R. Dawes; 7th Wis., Capt. John B. Callis. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 37; w, 251; m, 30 == 318. Antietam, k, 68; w, 275; m, 5 == 348. Artillery, Capt. J. Albert Monroe: 1st N. Y., Lieut. Frederick M. Edgell; D, 1st R. I., Capt. J. Albert Monroe; L, 1st N. Y., Capt. John A. Reynolds; B, 4th U. S., Capt. Joseph B. Campbell (w), Lieut. James Stewart. Artillery loss: Antietam, k, 12; w, 46; m, 8 == 66. Second division, Brig.-Gen. James B. Ricketts. First Br
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
the Mississippi. The latter was commanded by Bragg and the former by Van Dorn. Polk, Hardee, andhe Department. While Halleck at Corinth and Bragg at Tupelo were engaged in the congenial busineected into a separate military department, and Bragg was assigned to the command of all the countryginia. This was done on the 18th of July, and Bragg at once determined to transfer the bulk of hissportation and ammunition as prescribed in General Bragg's last general orders; that subsistence haoops, including those exchanged prisoners that Bragg has ordered sent to me. Not only were thesetle was about to resume his place at its head, Bragg turned to Little and said: You had the reputat find that Rosecrans had gone to Nashville, as Bragg believed. His cavalry under Armstrong entered done this when Price received a telegram from Bragg urging him to hasten to Nashville. [See map, d what to do in view of this latest order from Bragg, when, during the night of the 18th, one of Va[24 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
nts an effectual advance except on the railroads, when time, fortifications, and rolling stock will again render them superior to us. Our force, including what you have with Hurlbut, will garrison Corinth and Jackson, and enables us to push them. Our advance will cover even Holly Springs, which would be ours when we want it. All that is needful is to continue pursuing and whip them. We have whipped, and should now push them to the wall and capture all the rolling stock of their railroads. Bragg's army alone, west of the Alabama River, and occupying Mobile, could repair the damage we have it in our power to do them. If, after considering these matters, you still consider the order for my return to Corinth expedient, I will obey it and abandon the chief fruits of a victory, but, I beseech you, bend everything to push them while they are broken and hungry, weary and ill-supplied. Draw everything possible from Memphis to help move on Holly Springs, and let us concentrate. Appeal to