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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Thomas P. Branch or search for Thomas P. Branch in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
re sat General Lee, President Davis and General Longstreet, killing two or three horses and wounding several men. First, Kemper, then Jenkins, and after these, four other brigades of Longstreet's division, charged through the thick woods and swamp, with a battle front of only three-fouths of a mile. McCall was soon thrown back on Sumner and Heintzleman. Battery after battery was taken and then lost. The woods were soon full of dead and dying men. A. P. Hill's division was then ordered in. Branch's, Field's and Pender's brigades were hotly engaged. Bayonets were crossed in those dark woods. In the language of General McCall: Bayonet wounds were freely given and received. I saw skulls crushed by the heavy blows of the butt of the musket, and in short the desperate thrusts and parries of life and death encounter proved, indeed, that Greek had met Greek, when the Alabama boys fell upon the sons of Pennsylvania. The battle raged with fury, and death held high carnival. The 47th Virg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
on's Landing. After remaining there a few days, the division was ordered to Richmond, and it remained below that city until July 27, when General A. P. Hill's division was attached to Jackson's corps, and marched to Gordonsville, Virginia. On August 7th, Jackson moved from Gordonsville, to confront General Pope in the Valley, and on the 9th he fell upon General Banks' right flank at Cedar Mountain. At one time the day seemed doubtful. When the foe had well nigh crushed General Garnett, Branch went gallantly to his rescue, and with Pender's and other brigades of Hill's division, drove the enemy headlong from the field. Major Andrews having taken sick at Gordonsville, Captain John Ashford was in command of 38th, and received commendation from General Pender for his coolness and skilfulness in handling his men. D. M. McIntyre was now adjutant, having been promoted on July 9th, for gallantry and efficiency. On account of ill-health, Major Andrews resigned his commission, and on the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
est Point, Va. Following are the Virginia members of the Six Hundred: Lieutenant-Colonels. Charles B. Christian, Forty-ninth Infantry, Allen's creek, Amherst county. James C. Council, Twenty-sixth Infantry, St. Steven's Church. Majors. Richard Woodrum, Twenty-sixth Battalion, Union, Monroe co. Peter V. Batte, Forty-fourth Battalion, Petersburg. William H. Hood, Petersburg Militia, Berlin, Southampton co. D. A. Jones, General M. Jones' staff, Harrisonburg. Thomas P. Branch, General Ransom's staff, Petersburg. Captains. J. McD. Carrington, Charlottesville Battery, Charlottesville. E. E. DePriest, Twenty-third Infantry, Richmond. W. P. Carter, Page's Battery, Millwood, Clarke county. George W. Mercer, Twenty-ninth Battery, Rural Retreat. J. H. Johnson, Twenty-fifth Virginia, Franklin, Pendleton co. J. J. Dunkle, Twenty-fifth Infantry, Franklin, Pendleton co. H. C. Dickinson, Second Cavalry, Liberty, Bedford county. J. W. Mathews, Twen