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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Brandon or search for Brandon in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
tions to advance and gain a road which entered the city from the northwest; Dennis' brigade remained a short distance in the rear to guard the trains. Six brigades arrayed in battle by the accomplished General McPherson, against two battalions, one regiment, and a battery of four guns! General Johnston's forces, about 6,000 strong, encamped the night of the 14th, 5 miles from Jackson on the Canton road. As many of the stores as could be run out of the city by railroads to Canton and Brandon, and by wagons, were safely removed, and General Grant's army was free to turn upon General Pemberton. The situation in Mississippi was so serious that additional troops were ordered from South Carolina, and on May 15th the secretary of war directed General Beauregard to send Evans' brigade with all dispatch to General Johnston. The governor of South Carolina, the mayor of Charleston and General Beauregard all remonstrated with the President against stripping the coast of the State almo
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
and Sharpsburg, Md., at Kinston and Goldsboro, N. C., and in Mississippi at the second battle of Jackson, where his left arm was torn by a shell, necessitating its amputation. Falling into the hands of the enemy he was held in the field hospital ten days, when he attempted to make his escape through the swamps, frightfully wounded as he was, but before he had been a half hour out ran into the headquarters of Dr. Hinkley, the Federal post surgeon. He was well cared for and sent by wagon to Brandon, where a little later he slipped out of the hospital and took train for Meridian. Soon afterward obtaining a transfer to the South Carolina college hospital at Columbia, he turned toward home on reaching Kingsville, and a month later reported for duty to his command then on Sullivan's island. After a furlough of sixty days, he was ordered to Columbia, where he was employed in making out the applications of soldiers for retirement, until the State was invaded by Sherman's army. In Decembe