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r. Old soldiers think there are sixty thousand, Where are our men? A solitary battery of four guns, commanded by Capt. Carter Braxton, is to seen on the plain. The fire from the enemy's battery of twenty-two guns open upon it, but it makes no replt of no avail. They cannot stand the murderous fire. They give it up as a bad job. Meanwhile the battery in the field (Braxton's) has opened after long endurances, and at the right moment makes its mark. The coolness and precision with which it ithis division disappeared in the woods, when directly in their front the artillery of the old Stonewall brigade--Woodis, Braxton's, and three other batteries — opened a brisk fire on the enemy's batteries north of the railroad. At this time, owing r batteries along our whole front again reopened, and Col. Walker's artillery regiment, composed of Latham's, Letcher's, Braxton's, Pegram's, Crenshaw's, Johnson's, and McIntosh's batteries, stationed in the open low grounds to the east of the railr
ere the Brooke turnpike crosses the Chickahominy; the batteries of Braxton, Andrews, Pegram, Crenshaw, McIntosh, Bachman, and Johnson, with fon his (Field's) left, with his own left resting on the turnpike — Braxton being sent to the assistance of McIntosh. Gregg and Pender approaady engaged, and Johnson's battery took position near McIntosh and Braxton. Gregg was held in reserve near Mechanicsville. The thirty-eighter were also directed to do their part in this murderous contest. Braxton's artillery, accompanying Archer, had already opened. They were oe exhaustion of our troops. The batteries of Crenshaw, Johnson, Braxton, and Pegram were actively engaged. Crenshaw pretty well knocked taptains Collins, Engineer; and of the artillery, Pegram, Davidson, Braxton, Crenshaw, Andrews, McIntosh, and Lieutenant Fitzhugh, and Sergeanached to my staff, rendered fearless and valuable service. Captain Carter Braxton, with his Fredericksburg battery, seconded by Lieutenant Ma
d a second brook, we came upon a large body of woods. It being deemed advisable to shell these before advancing farther, the batteries of Captains Pegram, Fleet, Braxton, and Latham were placed in position under Lieutenant-Colonel Walker, some eighty or one hundred yards distant, and a heavy fire opened in various directions. Aftper officers. I moved forward as soon as possible, with all the artillery at my command, and by General Hill's order, brought the batteries of Captains Pegram, Braxton, Latham, and a part of Captain Fleet's battery, to bear upon the point supposed to be occupied by the enemy's. At ten o'clock that night, after firing about eight cannot be too highly commended. The batteries of my command cannot be too highly commended. The batteries of my command were all retired on Sunday evening, Captain Braxton bringing up the rear and retiring by half battery. I have the honor to remain, Major, Your obedient servant, R. L. Walker, Lieutenant-Colonel, commandi
eries of Captains Pegram, McIntosh, Davidson, Braxton, and Crenshaw, and established them upon the by troops withdrawn to our left and centre. Braxton's battery, commanded by Lieutenant Marye, (Cahe woods. The next morning, my brigade, with Braxton's battery, was posted on a hill on the extremments were sent, under my command, to support Braxton's and Davidson's batteries, and to prevent, is. This did not, however, happen, and so Captain Braxton's battery was not engaged then. The otheg from Jeffersonton to Warrenton Springs, Captains Braxton and Davidson were in position. All was qh unremitted severity, it was withdrawn. Captain Braxton was then ordered to the position, and, wiurday, August thirtieth, the batteries of Captains Braxton, Pegram, Latham, Davidson, McIntosh, and the engagement, Captain Crenshaw relieved Captain Braxton, whose ammunition was exhausted. Aftere balance having given out) together with Captain Braxton's rifle, which had been engaging the enem[18 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Braxton, Carter, 1736-1797 (search)
Braxton, Carter, 1736-1797 A signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Newington, Va., Sept. 10. 1736; was educated at the College of William and Mary in 1756, and resided in England until 1760. He was a distinguished member and patriot in the Virginia House of Burgesses in supporting the resolutions of Patrick Henry in 1765, and in subsequent assemblies dissolved by the governor. He remained in the Virginia Assembly until royal rule ceased in that colony, and was active in measd in that colony, and was active in measures for defeating the schemes of Lord Dunmore. Braxton was in the convention at Richmond in 1775, for devising measures for the defence of the colony and the public good; and in December he became the successor of Peyton Randolph in Congress. He remained in that body to vote for and sign the Declaration of Independence. In 1786, after serving in the Virginia legislature, he became one of the executive council. He died in Richmond, Va., Oct. 10, 1797.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Declaration of Independence. (search)
Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry. Rhode Island, Etc. Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery. Connecticut. Roger Sherman, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott. New York. William Floyd, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris. New Jersey. Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark. North Carolina. William Hooper, Joseph Hewes, John Penn. Georgia. Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, George Walton. Pennsylvania. Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamiin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, William Paca, George Ross. Delaware. Caesar Rodney, George Read, Thomas McKean. Maryland. Samuel Chase, James Wilson, Thomas Stone, Charles Carroll of Carrollton. Virginia. George Wythe, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Harrison Thomas Nelson, Jr., Francis Lightfoot Lee, Carter Braxton. South Carolina. Edward Rutledge, Thomas Heyward, Jr., Thomas Lynch, Jr., Arthur Middleton.
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 2: influence of Christian officers. (search)
influence of Christian officers. No army, with whose history I am acquainted, at least, was ever blessed with so large a proportion of high officers who were earnest Christian men, as the Army of Northern Virginia. We had at first such specimens of the Christian soldier as R. E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, D. H. Hill, T. R. Cobb, A. H. Colquitt, Kirby Smith, J. E. B. Stuart, W. N. Pendleton, John B. Gordon, C. A. Evans, A. M. Scales, Willie Pegram, Lewis Minor Coleman, Thos. H. Carter, Carter Braxton, Charles S. Venable, and a host of others too numerous to mention. And during the war Generals Ewell, Pender, Hood, R. H. Anderson, Rodes, Paxton, W. H. S. Baylor, Colonel Lamar, and a number of others of our best officers professed faith in Christ. Nor was the example of these noble men merely negative— many of them were active workers for the Master, and did not hesitate, upon all proper occasions, to stand up for Jesus. Our Christian President, Jefferson Davis, was always outsp
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 12: progress of the work in 1864-65. (search)
. Rev. A. B. Brown is greatly encouraged and delighted that he has found such an inviting field. The Secretary of War has promised to assign him to Carter's and Braxton's Battalions. Major Braxton's command is erecting a chapel, and as soon as it is completed a protracted meeting will be commenced there. Major Braxton, whose gaMajor Braxton's command is erecting a chapel, and as soon as it is completed a protracted meeting will be commenced there. Major Braxton, whose gallantry has been conspicuous on many memorable battle-fields, is a Baptist, and is deeply interested in all that pertains to the spiritual good of his men. He gives a cordial welcome to missionaries and colporters, and greatly aids them in gaining access to those under his command. Colonel Carter, too, is a Christian gentleman whoMajor Braxton, whose gallantry has been conspicuous on many memorable battle-fields, is a Baptist, and is deeply interested in all that pertains to the spiritual good of his men. He gives a cordial welcome to missionaries and colporters, and greatly aids them in gaining access to those under his command. Colonel Carter, too, is a Christian gentleman who has done great good by the efforts he has made in this direction, as well as by his own consistent example. I expect to spend several days with Brother Brown and then visit other portions of the army, where I have promised to aid in protracted meetings. Beyond all doubt this is the best season for such meetings. A. E. D. Mar
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
revious to the battle he had undergone immense fatigue: in the saddle day and night, with slight intermission, for forty-eight hours; wet, hungry, no blankets; engaging almost continually the cavalry of the enemy. On the very morning of the fight his breakfast consisted of a handful of parched corn, which he generously shared with a comrade. In the centre of the line of battle were posted one gun from his own battalion, commanded by Lieutenant Hollis (Ellett's Battery), and a section from Braxton's Battalion, commanded by Lieutenant Early. Further to the right, sweeping the Gilliam field, were the remaining three guns of Ellett's Battery. There had been during the morning some sharp skirmishing with the enemy, but everything had grown quiet towards midday, and old soldiers doubted whether there would be any general engagement. Pegram, wearied down by fatigue, was sleeping soundly among the guns on the right, when sudden, ripping volleys of musketry from the centre told him tha
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Roster of chaplains, army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Fifty-third North Carolina. J. H. Colton. Forty-fifth North Carolina. E. H. Harding. Forty-third North Carolina. E. W. Thompson. Second Battalion. Rev. Mr. Tennent. Thirty-second North Carolina. W. B. Richardson. D. R. Johnson's Brigade. Fifth North Carolina. Twelfth North Carolina. Twentieth North Carolina. James M. Sprunt. Twenty-third North Carolina. Artillery Second Corps (Colonel Carter). Cutshaw's Battalion. Rev. Mr. Page. Nelson's Battalion. T. Walker Gilmer. Braxton's Battalion. Rev. Dr. A. B. Brown; James Nelson. Page's Battalion. Hardaway's Battalion. T. M. Niven; Henry M. White. Third Corps (General A. P. Hill). Missionary Chaplains: Rev. Dr. Geo. D. Armstrong; Rev. J. Wm. Jones. Fifth Alabama Battalion (Provost Guard). Heth's Division. McRae's Brigade. Eleventh North Carolina. Twenty-sixth North Carolina. A. N. Wells. Forty-fourth North Carolina. R. S. Webb. Forty-seventh North Carolina. W. S. Lacy. Heth's Division—Cont
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