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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 4 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 10, 1863., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Braxton or search for Braxton in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A narrative of Stuart's Raid in the rear of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
golden opportunity to prosecute his foray. If the reader will take a map of the Peninsula and examine it carefully he will at once see the many difficulties the Confederates had to overcome and the great peril to which they were exposed during the reconnoissance. The command, as it passed over the county roads, presented a most formidable appearance, and to persons unaccustomed to witness military displays its strength was estimated at five thousand men. Stuart on his return to camp at Braxton's, near Richmond, issued the following general orders: General orders, no. 11. Headquarters cavalry brigade, June 16, 1862. The General of Cavalry, profoundly grateful to Divine Providence for the signal success attending the late expedition to the enemy's rear, takes pleasure in announcing in orders his appreciation of the bravery and cheerful endurance of the command. History will record in imperishable characters and a grateful country remember with gratitude that portion of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stray leaves from a soldier's Journal. (search)
statement: The enemy are upon your left flank, and are but a short distance from you. Upon this information, yet without seeing the enemy, Colonel Hardaway, generally cautious and thoroughly brave, gave the order to abandon the guns. Colonel Braxton had four guns in rear of us belonging to his battalion; they were also abandoned. The greater portion of these guns were spiked or cut down by our men, some of whom never left the guns at all. The First, Second and Third guns of the Third Cichmond Howitzers. Six or seven of the abandoned guns were recovered that night by the men, and one of them was given to Sergeant George D. Thaxton (Second Detachment, Third Company,) he having brought it off the field. This gun belonged to Braxton's battalion, but as we saved it, our boys held on to it We had a great deal of trouble to bring these guns up, for the roads were muddy and our horses almost famished. Saturday, April 8th.—It is impossible for us to reach Lynchburg, the quest