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men for three and five years. By what authority of the Constitution and law has he done this? The power is not in the Constitution, nor granted by law. Therefore, it must be illegal and unconstitutional. Again, the President, by his own will, has added immensely to the army, whereas the Constitution says Congress only have power to raise armies. He has also added to the navy against the warrant of the Constitution. These acts are not defended on constitutional or legal grounds, and Mr. Breckenridge pronounced them usurpations. This resolution goes on to recite that the President has suspended the writ of habeas corpus, and proposes to ratify and make that valid. We have a great deal to talk about rights — the rights of States, the rights of individuals, and some of them have been said to be shadowy and imaginary, but the right of every citizen to be arrested only by a warrant of law, and his right to have his body brought before a judicial authority, in order that the grounds
civil war was forced on the country by the disunionists in the South; delivered in the United States Senate, July 25, 1861, the following debate occurred: Mr. Breckenridge said he could not vote for the resolution, because he thought it did not state facts. The present condition of the country was due to the refusal of the maj, my life, my all shall be given freely for the purpose of maintaining the Union and carrying out in good faith the spirit and purport of this resolution. Mr. Breckenridge said the Senator had seen fit to answer most of the remarks he had made. He then referred to the amendment of the Senator from Illinois, claiming it to be along before the election, with the idea of forcing this issue to break up the Government, and I prove it by the declarations of his own friends in public. Mr. Breckenridge said a great many personal allusions have been made, which, though not unparliamentary, are yet ungenerous and unjust. The Senator from Wisconsin, I suppose