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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
as but slightly wounded, and that the bullet which cut the thread of his life was a stray one which struck him after the charge and while he was in the rear of Breckinridge's line in a position of comparative security. When darkness closed the battle of the first day, there was but little territory and comparatively few Federaly morning to this unhappy moment. Governor Johnson had accompanied the army on its retreat from Bowling Green, and went to the battlefield on the staff of General Breckinridge on Sunday morning; but when the Kentucky brigade was detached, he accompanied it and served on the staff of Colonel Trabue. At half past 9 o'clock his horlikewise wounded, as were also Lieuts. L. M. Tucker and Charles Dawson, the last named of whom was taken prisoner. Late in the evening of this second day, General Breckinridge, with the Kentucky brigade and Statham's, and some cavalry, undertook to check the enemy and cover the retreat. This was a hard duty, exposed as the comma
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
the army at Corinth Kentucky commands General Breckinridge sent to Vicksburg in the trenches theriver depletion of command by sickness General Breckinridge invited by General Bragg to command a d of Corinth was successfully covered by General Breckinridge's command, the pursuit not having been tion of the army which took place here, General Breckinridge's Reserve corps was composed of four brffered greatly. On the 27th of July, General Breckinridge was sent to make an attack on Baton Rouf General Clark, Capt. John A. Buckner, General Breckinridge's adjutant-general, was placed in commadoned and set on fire by her officers. General Breckinridge, in view of this failure of co-operatioinking water the men suffered greatly. General Breckinridge said: The enemy were well clothed and td by a just cause? Within a few days General Breckinridge sent a small force and occupied Port Huhis history visited the camp. He found General Breckinridge encamped on the Comite river, a small s
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
This is no formal acknowledgment. I can never forget that during all the operations they were ever prompt and cheerful, by night and day, in conveying orders, conducting to their positions regiments and brigades, rallying troops in the field, and, indeed, in the discharge of every duty. It gives me pleasure to name Lieutenant-Colonel Buckner, assistant adjutant-general, who was absent on leave, but returned upon the first rumor of battle; Colonel O'Hara, acting adjutant-general, Lieutenant Breckinridge, aide-de-camp; Major Graves, chief of artillery (twice wounded and his horse shot under him); Maj. James Wilson, assistant inspector-general (horse shot); Capt. Charles Semple, ordnance officer; Lieutenant Darragh, severely wounded. Captains Martin and Coleman, of my volunteer staff, were active and efficient. The former had his horse killed under him. Drs. J. F. Heustis and J. E. Pendleton, chief surgeon and medical inspector, were unremitting in their attention to the wounded
Preston. This brigade and Palmer's were the last of Breckinridge's command transferred to the west side of Stone's river of the river they fought bravely in the attack made by Breckinridge on January 2d. On the 31st the Fourth lost 55 in kille Next day they marched to Glass' mill, and on the 19th Breckinridge's division, to which the brigade was attached, took posry at Glass' mill, with instructions from MajorGen-eral Breckinridge to dispose of my command so as to repel any attack of tnstrations. At 9 p. m. I received an order from Major-General Breckinridge to join the division, so I left the position in of the hill. Lieut. J. Cabell Breckinridge, of Major-General Breckinridge's staff, was here of essential service to me. Riut at the instance of Major Graves, chief of artillery, Breckinridge's division, I went to the support of a battery a littleier general, was assigned as commander. It was part of Breckinridge's division, commanded by General Bate. This Florida br