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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 185 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 172 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 156 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 153 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 147 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 145 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 121 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 114 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 110 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 102 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for John C. Breckinridge or search for John C. Breckinridge in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 6 document sections:

federate force at Corinth numbered about forty thousand, divided into four corps commanded respectively by Major-Generals Polk, Bragg, and Hardee, and Brigadier-General Breckinridge. General Beauregard was second in command under General Johnston. The orders for the march and battle of the Confederate army were issued on the ral officers occurred just in rear of our second line, near the bivouac of General Bragg. The Commanderin-Chief, General Beauregard, Generals Polk, Bragg, and Breckinridge, are remembered as present. In a discussion of the causes of the delay and its incidents, it was mentioned that some of the troops, now in their third day onlengaged with our advanced pickets, the commander of the forces gave orders to begin the movement and attack as determined upon, except that Trabue's brigade of Breckinridge's division was detached and advanced to support the left of Bragg's corps and line of battle, then menaced by the enemy; and the other two brigades were direct
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 32: Confederate Congress.—The President's Message.—Horace Greeley. (search)
Chapter 32: Confederate Congress.—The President's Message.—Horace Greeley. In the absence of authorized reports of the debates in Congress which are unattainable, if they exist, I have from scrap books compiled excerpts to show the trend of public opinion, and appended Mr. Davis's message in which he treats of the recommendations made by that body, some of which are indicated by the subjoined extracts. Confederate Congress, August 23, 1862. Resolution of thanks to General J. C. Breckinridge and command for gallant conduct at the battle of Baton Rouge; also resolution of thanks to General Earl Van Dorn and command, and citizens of Vicksburg, for their defence of that city. Richmond, August 18, 1862. Several resolutions were offered in the House looking to the doctrine of lex talionis and the enlargement of the conscription. It was clear that these two matters would occupy the attention of Congress before other business could be entertained. As to the conscription, th
f cavalry, Frazier, Cheatham, Jackson, Green, A. J. Vaughn, O. F. Strahl, Archer, and the last, but not least, on this very incomplete list, Cadmus Wilcox, who led his brigade at Gettysburg on July 2d, right into the enemy's lines, capturing prisoners and guns, and only failing in great results from lack of the support looked for. Kentucky gave us John B. Hood, one of the bravest and most dashing division commanders in the army. Always in the front, he lost a limb at Chickamauga; John C. Breckinridge, Charley Field, S. B. Buckner, Morgan, Duke, and Preston; the latter with his fine brigades under Gracie, Trigg, and Kelly, gave the enemy the coup de grdce which terminated the battle of Chickamauga. Missouri gave us Bowen, and Green, and Price, that grand old man, worshipped and followed to the death by his brave patriotic Missourians. From Arkansas came the gallant Cleburne, McNair, McRea, and Finnegan, the hero of Olustee, Fla., and Ben McCullough, the old Indian fighter
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 63: the journey to Greensborough.—the surrender of Johnston. (search)
atch was received from him, stating that Sherman had agreed to a conference, and asking that the Secretary of War, General Breckinridge, should return to co-operate in it. When we arrived at Charlotte, on April 18, 1865, we received a telegram a assassination of Mr. Lincoln. The news had reached Charlotte, but was not credited. Somehow we learned that General Breckinridge would be on the train that afternoon, and with several other Kentuckians I went to the depot. His first desire wato Mr. Davis. We found him sitting in a chair in the door which opened on the sidewalk. After shaking hands with General Breckinridge, he asked immediately: Is it true, General, that Mr. Lincoln was killed? Yes, sir, replied General BreckinrGeneral Breckinridge (who had just come from the front). General Sherman received a telegram this morning that he was shot in Ford's theatre, at Washington, last night. Mr. Davis said promptly, and with feeling, I am sorry to learn it. Mr. Lincoln was a much
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 64: capture of President Davis, as written by himself. (search)
in the trans-Mississippi Department. At Washington the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Mallory, left me to place his family in safety. The Secretary of War, Mr. Breckinridge, had remained with the cavalry at the crossing of the Savannah River. During the night after my arrival in Washington he sent in an application for authorit orders issued by General Johnston. This was my first positive information of his surrender. Not receiving an immediate reply to the note addressed to General Breckinridge, I explained to Captain Campbell, of Kentucky, commanding my escort, that his company was not strong enough to fight, and too large to pass without observaransfer to Mr. Semple and Mr. Tidball the treasure in his hands, except a few thousand dollars. Mr. Reagan overtook me in a few hours. I saw no more of General Breckinridge, but learned subsequently that he followed our route to overtake me, but heard of my capture, and, turned to the east and reached the Florida coast unmole
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 80: General Joseph E. Johnston and the Confederate treasure. (search)
im to burn the Confederate notes in the presence of General Breckinridge and myself. The acceptances on Liverpool were turnhington, Ga., communications were received from General John C. Breckinridge, that payments had been promised by him to the cavalry from the train. General Breckinridge's action was ratified, and President Davis gave some other directions before he left. General Breckinridge arrived in Washington, Ga., an hour or so after President Davis left.-My recollection of his sn, Ga., with it, etc. A crowd gathered around, when General Breckinridge made them a little speech, appealing to their honorWashington, there was no good reason for delay. General Breckinridge replied that, if they wished an instant compliance for by within paper. I obtained permission from General Breckinridge and Mr. Reagan to burn a mass of currency and bondsbut to officers of higher rank, like Generals Bragg and Breckinridge, or to members of the President's military family, they