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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 185 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 172 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 156 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 153 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 147 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 145 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 121 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 114 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 110 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 102 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for John C. Breckinridge or search for John C. Breckinridge in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
ny sections of the State a strong sentiment against disunion. The vote for presidential candidates in Georgia is a fair criterion of the sentiment in the State prior to the election of Mr. Lincoln. There were three electoral tickets: One for Breckinridge and Lane, one for Bell and Everett, one for Douglas and Johnson, but none for Lincoln and Hamlin. The vote stood as follows: Breckinridge and Lane, 51,893; Bell and Everett, 42,855; Douglas and Johnson, 11,580. As the Breckinridge ticket wasBreckinridge and Lane, 51,893; Bell and Everett, 42,855; Douglas and Johnson, 11,580. As the Breckinridge ticket was favored by the most pronounced Southern rights men, the vote in Georgia showed a small majority against immediate secession by separate State action. But the election of Mr. Lincoln by a purely sectional vote set the current toward secession, causing the tide of disunion sentiment to rise with steadily increasing volume, and strengthening the views and fears of those who could see relief only by withdrawing from a union which had fallen under the control of a party favoring a policy so antago
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
ell (wounded), and Maj. Henry C. Kellogg, of the same regiment, and Capts. T. B. Lyons and Patterson of his staff. In the sanguinary struggle at Murfreesboro, or Stone's river, December 31st to January 2d, Gen. John K. Jackson's brigade, of Breckinridge's division, which included the Fifth regiment of infantry and the Second Georgia battalion of sharpshooters, was in various parts of the field at different stages of the battle, but experienced all its severe loss in the brief space from noon to three in the afternoon of December 31st, when it was sent by Breckinridge to join in the assault upon the Federal center. Jackson twice charged the enemy's strong position, but for the want of support from others, and the smallness of his own numbers, was forced to take the cover of a thick cedar wood. Both times the men fell back in good order and were reformed in line, until they were ordered to retire from the want of ammunition. Col. William T. Black, of the Fifth, fell in the charge a
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
ent and Fourth sharpshooters. The division of Maj.-Gen. John C. Breckinridge soon came up from Mississippi, bringing with i engaged in the fight of the 19th, while Bragg yet had Breckinridge, Hindman and Preston to put in, and Kershaw and Humphreduring the early morning Polk sent officers directly to Breckinridge and Cleburne, directing them to attack immediately. Br. H. Hill's line, and presently the attack was begun by Breckinridge, soon followed by Cleburne. The Federal army was welept round the Federal left to Thomas' rear, and part of Breckinridge's division had similar success. But these were forced after W. S. Phillips was wounded, shared the service of Breckinridge's division Saturday morning and evening, and in the fi Gist's brigade was called for by D. H. Hill to support Breckinridge when it came upon the field Sunday morning after an allain. About the last of October, Longstreet, Hardee and Breckinridge were ordered to examine the situation on Lookout creek
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
n. J. E. Johnston given command close of 1863. On November 3, 1863, General Bragg summoned Longstreet, Hardee and Breckinridge, then his infantry corps commanders, in consultation. Longstreet had an inkling that it was proposed to send him agaier, of Cumming's staff, were badly wounded. The Georgians of Bate's brigade shared in the distinguished service of Breckinridge's division under Bate's command, in repelling the attacks upon their front, and in forming a second line after the firor two hours and a half. At noon General Hardee sent word that the train was safe, and after consultation with Generals Breckinridge and Wheeler, who were present, Cleburne withdrew from the ridge, hauled back his cannon by hand, and undisturbed ic line in the rear lest he might create an injurious impression. Cleburne held Tunnel Hill; Stewart, Mill Creek gap; Breckinridge lay between the gap and Dalton; Hindman was mainly southwest of Dalton; Stevenson near Hindman; Walker east of Dalton,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
as far south of that as possible. In compliance with this order, Johnson's and Baird's divisions, of Palmer's corps, occupied Ringgold on the 22d of February, and Cruft's division went to Red Clay on the railroad to Cleveland, Tenn. Davis' division reinforced Palmer at Ringgold. Long's brigade of cavalry advanced toward Dalton. The whole Federal strength in this movement was twelve brigades of infantry, one of cavalry, and several batteries. To meet them Johnston posted Stewart's and Breckinridge's divisions before Mill Creek gap, northeast of Dalton, and Stevenson north of Dalton. On February 24th, Palmer advanced in three columns, the center directed against Wheeler's cavalry. As Thomas reported, the center met with a fire at long range from a battery of Parrott guns, the enemy's practice being excellent and succeeding in checking the column. But the flanking columns advanced and compelled Wheeler to retire, and the Federals encamped that night in the valley immediately befor
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
l Upton, who was ordered to Augusta, caused the arrest of Vice-President Stephens, Secretary Mallory and Senator Hill. President Davis arrived at Washington, Ga., the home of Gen. Robert Toombs, May 4, 1865, and remained there about thirty-six hours. His family was with him, consisting of Mrs. Davis and four children, accompanied by her sister, Miss Howell, and Midshipman Howell, her brother. General Bragg, Gen. I. M. St. John, Gen. A. R. Lawton, Postmaster-General John H. Reagan, General Breckinridge, secretary of war, and a considerable number of other Confederate officials and officers, also arrived at Washington. On the 5th this party, the last representatives of the Confederate States government, separated, General Reagan alone accompanying the President in a westward direction. At Irwin's cross-roads and at Dublin they were threatened by strolling bands, but escaped danger. At daylight on the morning of May 10th, a detachment of Michigan cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel P
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
n in the war he rose to the rank of major-general. Among the last official autographs of John C. Breckinridge was his signature, as secretary of war, to Benning's commission. Alas! both of them havek ordered him into the fight at Cowan's house, where Withers' division had been repulsed. As Breckinridge's command, composed of three brigades, was coming up in the rear, General Jackson asked if it would not be better to wait until Breckinridge was in line, as the enemy was very strong; but General Polk replied, Jackson, there's the enemy, go in. He went in, accordingly, and his brigade was cugot upon the left flank and rear of the enemy and materially assisted in winning the day. General Breckinridge, the division commander, said in his report: To Brigadier-General Stovall, to Colonel Lewed forward Sunday morning, Gist's division moved with Govan, of Liddell's division, on right, Breckinridge and Cheatham in the rear and on General Gist's left. He continued: I owe it to myself and to