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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 185 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 172 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 156 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 153 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 147 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 145 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 121 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 114 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 110 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 102 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John C. Breckinridge or search for John C. Breckinridge in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Shiloh [from the New Orleans, la, Picayune, Sept., 25, 1904.] (search)
Tennessee. On Saturday afternoon while waiting the dispopition of the troops, a council of war was held, in which Generals Johnston, Beauregard, Bragg, Polk, Breckinridge and Gilmer took part. The Confederate army was in line of battle within two miles of Shiloh Church, and of General Grant's line. General Beauregard proposed ither's on the right and Ruggle's on the left. This line was 10,731 strong. The third line, the reserve under Polk (the 1st Corps), with three brigades under Breckinridge. Polk's corps was massed in columns of brigades on the Bark Road, near Mickey's and Breckinridge's, on the road from Monterey toward the same point. Polk wBreckinridge's, on the road from Monterey toward the same point. Polk was to advance on the left of the Park road, at an interval of eight hundred paces from Bragg's line, and Breckenridge to the right of that road was to give support whenever necessary. Polk's corps was composed of two divisions, Cheatham's on the left, and Clark's on the right, being an effective force of 9,136 men in infantry and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
to the tombs of the Revolutionary patriots, Francis Nash and Joseph Warren, of Edward Buncombe and William Davidson, who taught us rebellion—and died in teaching us—and make answer: Every tree is known by his own fruit. The land that gave the rebels George Washington and Patrick Henry, Richard Caswell and Jethro Sumner to lead and counsel the men whom we commemorate in centennial celebrations, gave also in these latter days Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, Alexander Stephens and John C. Breckinridge, Leonidas Polk and Albert Sidney Johnston, worthy sons of noble sires. A good tree bringeth not forth corrupt fruit, neither doth a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit. Behold in these men the true exponents of the South and her cause, the outgrowth of her civilization! Does any land show their superiors? By them, our exemplars, let us be judged. But why multiply words? Let the whole world contemn, still will we love and honor the voiceless dust that lies here-aye and a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
nable to comprehend, because they could have been used to good advantage. Breckinridge, with 4,000 men, and Hindman, with 5, 6000, also those of Preston's Brigade,between 9 and 10 o'clock, final orders were received to begin the battle. Breckinridge advanced, and, together with Helm's Brigade, became furiously engaged with as turned on the enemy. Seeing that the Federal line was practically turned, Breckinridge changed front at right angles to the Chattanooga road, facing southward, witelm's Brigade had been equally cut up, and the situation seemed critical. Breckinridge was being hard pressed. Hill sent Colquitt's Brigade to receive the pressurgg's, Gracie's and Kelly's Brigades and Johnson's Division on his left, with Breckinridge and Forrest on the right, moved forward like a mighty current, and striking now strengthened his command until he mustered over 35,000 muskets. Finally Breckinridge, on the right, then Liddell, while Cleburne pressed forward in the centre, a