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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brewster, William, 1560-1644 (search)
, to replenish his exhausted funds, He had then been an elder and teacher for some time. By the assistance of some friends he procured a printing-press, and published several books against the English hierarchy. In Mr. Robinson's church in Leyden Brewster was a ruling elder, and was so highly esteemed that he was chosen the spiritual guide of the Pilgrims who emigrated to America. He took with him to the wilderness his wife and numerous children. It was upon the lid of his chest that the polgrims who emigrated to America. He took with him to the wilderness his wife and numerous children. It was upon the lid of his chest that the political compact was signed on board the Mayflower. At New Plymouth he supplied the vacant pulpit most of the time for Elder Brewster's chest and dinner-pot. nine years, preaching very impressive sermons; but he could never be persuaded to administer the Lord's supper, though he had the care of the church. He died at Plymouth, Mass., April 10, 1644.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brownists, (search)
t Brown. The sect sprang up towards the close of the sixteenth century. As early as 1580, Brown began to inveigh against the ceremonies of the Church of England. Being opposed by the bishops, he and his congregation left England, and settled in Zealand, where they formed a church upon a model to suit themselves. The seed he had planted in England grew so abundantly that at the close of the century there were about 20,000 Brownists in the realm. Of that sect were Rev. Mr. Robinson, Elder Brewster, and the congregation at Leyden in 1620. The founder of this sect was born about the year 1550, and died about 1630. His family were closely connected with Cecil, afterwards Lord Burleigh. Educated at Cambridge, as soon as he left college he began a vigorous opposition to the whole discipline and liturgy of the Established Church. He taught that all the members of a church were equal, and that the pastor should be chosen by the congregation. See Bradford. William: The First Dialogue.