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Simpkins are missing. The Quartermaster and Surgeon are safe and are with the regiment. Dr. Stone remained on the Alice Price during Saturday night, caring for the wounded until she left Morris Island, and then returned to look after those who were left behind. The Assistant Surgeon was at the camp on St. Helena Island, attending to duty there. Lieutenant Littlefield was also in charge of the camp at St. Helena.. Lieutenant Higginson was on Folly Island with a detail of eighty men. Captain Bridge and Lieutenant Walton are sick and were at Beaufort or vicinity. Captain Partridge has returned from the North, but not in time to participate in the action. Of the privates and non-commissioned officers I send you a list of one hundred and forty-four who are now in the Beaufort hospitals. A few others died on the boats or since their arrival here. There may be others at the Hilton Head hospital; and others are doubtless on Morris Island; but I have no names or statistics relative
nd-guards stationed in their first line of rifle-pits, captured something over two hundred men, and secured themselves in their new position before the enemy had sufficiently recovered from his surprise to attempt to send reenforcements from his main camp. Orders were then given to General Granger to make his position secure by constructing temporary breastworks, and throwing out strong pickets to his front. Howard's corps was moved up on the left of Granger with the same instructions, and Bridge's battery (Ill.) was placed in position on Orchard Knob. The troops remained in that position for the night. The Tennessee River having risen considerably from the effect of the previous heavy rain-storm, it was found difficult to rebuild the pontoonbridge at Brown's Ferry. Therefore, it was determined that General Hooker should take Osterhaus's division, which was still in Lookout valley, Geary's division, and Whitaker's and Grose's brigades of the First division, Fourth corps, under B
Mathematics: Davies's Analytical Geometry. Natural History: Lectures. Second Term.--Physics: Olmsted's Astronomy. History: Weber, concluded. Intellectual Philosophy: Wayland's. Rhetoric: Whately's Logic; Themes; Original Declamations. Hygiene: Lectures. Elective Studies.--Latin: Tacitus' Germania and Agricola; Latin Translations. Greek: Thucydides; Greek Translations. French: Collot's Chefs d'oeuvre Dramatiques. Italian: Ollendorff's Grammar; La Gerusalemme Liberata. Mathematics: Bridge's Conic Sections. Senior class.--First Term.--Physics: Chemistry, with Lectures. Intellectual Philosophy: Wayland's. Political Economy: Wayland's. Rhetoric: Whately's Logic; Themes; Forensics; Original Declamations. Elective Studies.--Latin: Terence's Andria; Translations from Greek into Latin. Greek: Sophocles' Antigone; Translations from Latin into Greek. German: Adler's Ollendorff and Reader. Mathematics: Davis's Linear Perspective. Second Term.--Physics: Mineralogy and Geology
the mill. The undertakers then bind themselves to erect a good gristmill on the spot of land above mentioned; and said mill shall be ready to go at or before the last day of September next. As guaranty for each party, they bind themselves in the penal sum of five hundred pounds. The mill was completed, and answered its purpose. It afterwards came into the possession of Timothy Waite, jun. He sold it to Seth Blodget, March 9, 1761. Mr. Blodget sold it to Matthew Bridge, Oct. 18, 1780. Mr. Bridge sold one half of it to John Bishop, April 7, 1783; and sold the other half to John Bishop, jun., April 29, 1784. John Bishop sold the whole to Gershom Cutter, who sold to Samuel Cutter, who sold to George T. Goodwin, its present owner. This mill has had various fortunes, and, by turns, has done all sorts of work. Whether it has been most successful in grinding grain or mustard-seeds or paints, or in sawing mahogany and turning wood, we know not. May 10, 1766: It was again suggested
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Third Battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
s. On the 6th, the section was ordered to return to Rolling Fork, and upon its arrival, Lieutenant Ritter was complimented by General Ferguson and Lieutenant Wood, on his management of his guns. On the 14th, both sections of artillery, and Major Bridge's battalion of cavalry, were ordered to Greenville, and on the 16th proceeded to their old camp at Fish Lake. The morning of May 18th, 1863, dawned with splendid promise. The sun rose bright and clear, chasing away the mist and fog that hi, the whole produces upon the mind a strong impression of the magnificent prodigality of nature. Add to it the enchanting effect of the sunlight of a bright May morning, and the scene becomes one of indiscribable beauty. The Marylanders of Major Bridge's command were surrendering themselves to the charm of this romantic situation, when an order was received which made them oblivious of it all. The news had came in through the scouts that lined the river for many miles above, that a number of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missionary Ridge, battle of (search)
a lower hill a considerable distance in advance of the former. Wood's division of Granger's corps led the left, and Sheridan's the right. General Palmer supported Granger's right, Johnson's division remained in the trenches, and Howard's corps was in reserve. The Nationals soon drove the Confederates from Orchard Knob by a vigorous charge, carrying the rifle-pits on that eminence and taking 200 prisoners. Wood immediately intrenched; Howard moved up and took position on the left, and Bridge's (Illinois) battery was placed in position on the crest. Bragg had been fatally outgeneralled. To get Sherman's troops across the Tennessee without discovery, Hooker was ordered to divert the attention of the Confederates by an attack on Bragg's left on Lookout Mountain (q. v.). The troops had all crossed before noon of the 24th, and proceeded to attack the Confederates on the northern end of Missionary Ridge, and secured an important point. The night of the 24th was spent in important p
G. T. Beauregard, C. S. A., second in command. Personal Staff. Major A. R. Chisolm, A. D. C. Major A. J. Toutant, A. D. C. Major R. T. Beauregard, Prov. Arty., A. D. C. Second Lieut. A. R. Toutant, Tucker's Pioneer Regt., Acting A. D. C. Cadet H. T. Beauregard, C. S. A., Acting A. D. C. Lieut.-Col. A. G. Rice, Vol. A. D. C. Lieut.-Col. S. B. Paul, Vol. A. D. C. Col. Chas. J. Villere, Vol. A. D. C. Brig.-Genl. Thomas Jordan, Acting A. D. C. Private J. A. Hincks, Bridge's Battery, Detached Clerk. Private James M. Kokernot, Confederate Batt'n, Detached Orderly. General Staff. Adjutant-General's Department. Col. Geo. Wm. Brent, A. A. G. Lieut.-Col. Jno. M. Otey, A. A. G. Private Jno. C. Latham, Jr., Co. A, 7th Georgia Cavalry, Detached Clerk. Private M. N. Blakemore, Orleans Gd. Battery, Detached Clerk. Private James F. Salvo, Co. B, 25th S. C. Vol., Detached Orderly. Inspector-General's Department. Lieut.-Col. Alfred Roman, A. I.
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865, Genl. G. T. Beauregard, C. S. A., second in command. (search)
Genl. G. T. Beauregard, C. S. A., second in command. Personal Staff. Major A. R. Chisolm, A. D. C. Major A. J. Toutant, A. D. C. Major R. T. Beauregard, Prov. Arty., A. D. C. Second Lieut. A. R. Toutant, Tucker's Pioneer Regt., Acting A. D. C. Cadet H. T. Beauregard, C. S. A., Acting A. D. C. Lieut.-Col. A. G. Rice, Vol. A. D. C. Lieut.-Col. S. B. Paul, Vol. A. D. C. Col. Chas. J. Villere, Vol. A. D. C. Brig.-Genl. Thomas Jordan, Acting A. D. C. Private J. A. Hincks, Bridge's Battery, Detached Clerk. Private James M. Kokernot, Confederate Batt'n, Detached Orderly.
n's cavalry heard the firing and hastened to the spot. The Union cavalry attacked the besieging party in the rear, soon putting them to flight, and so released their friends. Of course, one bird does not make a summer, but these three infantrymen may indicate the presence of more of the same sort near the cavalry of Stoneman. With reference to the enfilading, Johnston spoke of the bare possibility of our enfilading him with artillery. The report of one of my officers, Lieutenant White, Bridge's Illinois Battery, says: At 6 P. M. General Howard brought this battery, with others, into position, from which we were able to fire with raking effect upon the flank of the Confederate lines occupying Cassville, while their front was facing the attack of Hooker. This operation took place, as we have before seen, the evening of May 19th, and will account for some of the serious impressions of Polk, if not of Hood, as they were subsequently evinced at their council. This council doubtl
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2., The Cutter family and its connection with a tide mill in Medford. (search)
aking, such as giving lands, and opening a straight road from the market to the mill site, and building a stone bridge over Gravelly creek for the mill's accommodation, the building of a dam, etc. The mill was to be ready for use before the last day of September, 1746. It was successfully completed and answered well its purpose. Timothy Waite, Jr., acquired possession at an early period in its history. Seth Blodget bought it of him on March 9, 1761. Matthew Bridge followed Blodget on Oct. 18, 1780. Mr. Bridge disposed of it to the Bishops —John, Senior, and John, Junior—in 1783 and 1784, and John Bishop, probably the junior, sold the whole to Gershom Cutter, who was followed in ownership by Samuel Cutter, George T. Goodwin, and Joseph Manning. These items regarding the Cutters differ a little from the statements of the preceding articles, which are based on facts received from descendants (mostly now deceased) of the John Cutter who first occupied the mill before the year 1788.
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