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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 6 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22.. You can also browse the collection for Jennie S. Brigham or search for Jennie S. Brigham in all documents.

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ere was a small building left on the place on Canal street. It had but one room, where an insane person was kept—Nathaniel Crowell, commonly called Nat Crow. It had one window with iron bars. It would seem in those days insane people were looked on as criminals, and treated worse. The boys secured this building, had a door cut in it large enough to run the engine into, and, it seems, fastened by a staple, as one day we were surprised to see a poster which read— Mystic no. 4. Five dollars Reward. The above sum is offered for the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who entered the above Co's engine house by drawing the staple on the night of the 19th inst. Per order Arthur G. Smith, Clerk. John Hebden, Foreman. I cannot recall any fire they attended, as that was tabooed. I have said it was short-lived. Alas! they could not raise money enough to clear off the debt, and the tub was claimed by the builder, who was also the foreman. Jennie S. Brigham
Editor's Comment. In a personal interview Mrs. Brigham mentions interesting facts about the Medford of her childhood days; of the Indians that came on the river to Rock hill and up Woburn lane to the Rocks, as the Middlesex Fells used to be called; of the digging for the pirate's treasure near the big rock; and of a family burial-ground in our old town. There are older people than she, long resident here, who ought to be able to add their bit to historic fact relating to Medford, which to be called; of the digging for the pirate's treasure near the big rock; and of a family burial-ground in our old town. There are older people than she, long resident here, who ought to be able to add their bit to historic fact relating to Medford, which the Register's pages will preserve. Mrs. Brigham's paper on Mystic Hall Seminary, read before the Historical Society eleven years ago (see Regis-Ter, Vol. XI, p. 49) is the only historical mention extant of a once famous Medford school.