Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Bristow or search for Bristow in all documents.

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s likewise ordered, at 9 P. M., August 27. to press forward, at the very earliest dawn, toward Manassas Junction, resting his right on the Manassas Gap Railroad, while Reno advanced simultaneously from Greenwich upon Manassas, and Kearny upon Bristow. Kearny reached Bristow at 8 A. M., August 28. with Reno on his left, and was immediately pushed forward, followed by Hooker, on the track of Ewell. McDowell gave orders for the required movement at 2 A. M.; but Sigel, who held his advance,Bristow at 8 A. M., August 28. with Reno on his left, and was immediately pushed forward, followed by Hooker, on the track of Ewell. McDowell gave orders for the required movement at 2 A. M.; but Sigel, who held his advance, had not fairly cleared Gainesville at 7 1/2 A. M. Meantime, Jackson, who was not easily caught napping, had commenced his evacuation of Manassas at 3 A. M., moving via Centerville; and thus escaping the destruction which probably awaited him had he persisted in seeking a more immediate junction with Longstreet's advance. Pope reached Manassas, with Kearny's division and Reno's corps, about noon; Jackson having left with his rear-guard an hour earlier. Pope immediately pushed forward all h
Meade, on reflection, was evidently ashamed — as well he might be — of this flight — which, the Rebels assert, continued up to Fairfax Court House — and would have attempted to retrace his steps directly; but a heavy rain Oct. 16. had rendered Bull Run unfordable, and obliged him to send for pontoons; meantime, the enemy, after skirmishing along his front and making feints of attack, retreated as rapidly as they had advanced, completely destroying the Orange and Alexandria Railroad from Bristow to the Rappahannock — Stuart, aided by a flank attack from Fitz Hugh Lee, worsting Kilpatrick, by force of numbers, in a not very sanguinary encounter Oct. 19. near Buckland's Mills, whence our cavalry fell back nimbly to Gainesville. In this affair, Custer's brigade did most of the fighting on our side; but the enemy was so vastly the stronger, backed by infantry, that Kilpatrick did well to escape with little loss. Stuart claims to have taken 200 prisoners. Lee recrossed the Ra