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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 10 0 Browse Search
The Soldiers' Monument in Cambridge: Proceedings in relation to the building and dedication of the monument erected in the years, 1869-1870. 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 20, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 8 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 6 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Broadway or search for Broadway in all documents.

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Crowded Sidewalks. --Broadway, in the wicked city of New York, never presented a more animated appearance in the palmy days than did our Main street promenade yesterday morning. An agreeable change in the weather gave the ladies an opportunity to make a display, which they were not slow to take advantage of. Then there were lots of gay-looking officers; soldiers dressed in popular gray; country merchants, strangers, and not a few loafers, jesting each other, without regard to the rules of etiquette. A good deal of embarrassment might be avoided by adopting the rule formerly posted on the toll-gates--"turn to the right, as the law directs."