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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 15, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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ured the rebel steamer Darlington, containing military stores, army wagons, mules, forage, etc., and fortunately secured the draw-bridge, which was held during the night by the second launch of the Wabash. There were passengers, women and children, in the Darlington, and the brutal captain suffered her to be fired upon, and refused to hoist a white flag, notwithstanding the entreaties of the women. No one was injured. I send the captain of the steamer home, a prisoner. His name is Jacob Brock; he is a native of Vermont, but has been a resident of Florida for twenty-three years. The same night, Corn. C. R. P. Rodgers ascended the St. Mary's with the Ottawa, and took possession of the town, driving out a picket of the enemy's cavalry. Early in the morning the town of Fernandina was also occupied by a party of seamen and marines from Com. Drayton's command. In both places most of the inhabitants had fled, by order, it is said, of the rebel authorities. A company of sea
steamer Darlington, containing artillery stores, army wagons, mules, forage, &c., and fortunately secured the draw-bridge, which was held during the night by the second launch of the Wabash. There were passengers, including women and children, aboard the Darlington, and yet the brutal Captain suffered her to be fired upon, and refused to hoist the white flag, notwithstanding the entreaties of the women. No one was injured. I send the Captain of the steamer home a prisoner. His name is Jacob Brock. He is a native of Vermont, but has been a resident of Florida for twenty-three years. The same night, Commander O. P. Rodgers ascended the at Mary's with the Ottowa, and took possession of the town, driving out a picket of the enemy's cavalry. Early in the morning the town of Fernandina was also occupied by a party of seamen and marines, from Commander Drayton's command. In both places most of the inhabitants had fied, by order, it is said, of the rebel authorities. A compan