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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for R. A. Brock or search for R. A. Brock in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
e above I have tried to call your attention to historical facts, without any coloring at all, and, as far as possible, let others speak in behalf of my gallant brigade of North Carolinians. I hope it will interest you. I think my letter was published in the Dispatch of September 20, 1867, and, as far as I know, neither it nor the article in the Petersburg Index has ever been republished. I have never read Pollard's book, I am sorry to say. Yours very sincerely, James H. Lane. R. A. Brock, Esq. Lee and his Lieutenants. [editorial Petersburg daily index, September 11, 1869.] In Pollard's new work, Lee and His Lieutenants, in the sketch of Major-General Cadmus M. Wilcox's career, there occurs an error into which the author should not have fallen, considering his claimed acquaintance with the composition of General Lee's army. On page 506 the following occurs: From this summary record we must detach one incident that glorified the last days of the Confederacy, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Burkett Davenport Fry. (search)
Marshall Manufacturing Company, of which his brother-in-law, the late John Lyddall Bacon, was the president. Upon the death of Mr. Bacon, General Fry succeeded him as president and held this position at the time of his death. His remains were interred by the side of his wife in Alabama. General Fry was of slight physique and medium height, and of mien so modest and gentle that a stranger would never have suspected that a form so frail held the lion spirit of so redoubtable a warrior. He was a man of fine intellectual gifts and attainments, and a critical observer. He possessed fine conversational talents, which, with his varied and adventurous experience, made him a delightful companion. He was an earnest member of the Executive Committee of the Southern Historical Society, and his associates in that body bear affectionate testimony to his devotion as a patriot, his worth as a citizen, and to his zeal as a co-worker. R. A. Brock, Secretary of the Southern Historical Society.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General John Rogers Cooke. (search)
and Confederate States navies, and granddaughter of Robert Patton, of Fredericksburg, Va., and his wife, Ann Gordon, daughter of General Hugh Mercer, of the Revolution. She is a niece of the late John Mercer Patton, Governor of Virginia, and a cousin of Colonel John Mercer Patton, commander of the Twenty-first Virginia Infantry, Confederate States Army. Mrs. Cooke survives with eight children-John R., Fairlie P., Ellen Mercer, Philip St. George, Rachel, Hattie, Nannie, and Stuart. Three sisters also survive General Cooke—Mrs. Stuart, the widow of the gallant sabreur General J. E. B. Stuart; Mrs. Brewer, wife of Dr. Charles Brewer, assistant surgeon in the late war, and a younger and unmarried sister, who resides with her parents at Detroit, Mich. The associates of General Cooke in the Executive Committee of the Southern Historical Society cherish the memory of his virtues as a faithful friend and a zealous co-worker. R. A. Brock, Secretary of the Southern Historical Society
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 28 (search)
not paroled at Appomattox was because they obeyed orders to disband and shift for themselves. I have written this much in justice to that little band of heroic men who ever responded with promptness and gallantry to every command on that never-to-be-forgotten retreat from Petersburg to Appomattox; who saved a part of the cavalry from a shameful stampede at Namazine Creek; who met and successfully resisted the charging columns of General Custer near Amelia Courthouse, saving, in all probability, the great Lee from capture; who, as before mentioned, captured the last guns at Appomattox, and having remained faithful and loyal to the last, I beg that you will give this a place in your forthcoming volume, to the end that their devotion to duty and a proof of their heroic valor may be preserved and transmitted to those who are to come after them. Very respectfully, W. P. Roberts, Late Brigadier-General C. S. A. R. A. Brock, Esq., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.