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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John W. Brockenbrough or search for John W. Brockenbrough in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ment left to be disbanded to my wife, who has it now. My company flag is also in my possession. During, the winter of 1861-62, Colonel George H. Steuart, commanding the First Maryland regiment; of which I was then Lieutenant-Colonel, exerted himself for the organization of the Maryland Line. Our people had become scattered all through the army. We had the First regiment of infantry, Maryland Light Artillery, Captain R. Snowden Andrews, and Baltimore Light Artillery, Captain J. B. Brockenbrough, as the sole Maryland representatives in the army. But besides that there were Maryland companies in the First, Sixth and Seventh Virginia cavalry, Thirteenth, Twenty-first and Forty-seventh Virginia infantry; besides a body of Marylanders enlisted in the First South Carolina artillery, and Lucas's battalion of South Carolina artillery, and our men, alone, or by twos or threes, were in very many regiments from Texas to Virginia. The Congress of the Confederate States, in response to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland line in the Confederate Army. (search)
ment left to be disbanded to my wife, who has it now. My company flag is also in my possession. During, the winter of 1861-62, Colonel George H. Steuart, commanding the First Maryland regiment; of which I was then Lieutenant-Colonel, exerted himself for the organization of the Maryland Line. Our people had become scattered all through the army. We had the First regiment of infantry, Maryland Light Artillery, Captain R. Snowden Andrews, and Baltimore Light Artillery, Captain J. B. Brockenbrough, as the sole Maryland representatives in the army. But besides that there were Maryland companies in the First, Sixth and Seventh Virginia cavalry, Thirteenth, Twenty-first and Forty-seventh Virginia infantry; besides a body of Marylanders enlisted in the First South Carolina artillery, and Lucas's battalion of South Carolina artillery, and our men, alone, or by twos or threes, were in very many regiments from Texas to Virginia. The Congress of the Confederate States, in response to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
nd Manassas and Sharpsburg. By Colonel William Allan, Late Chief of Ordnance Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Is it possible to obtain a correct roster of the Confederate artillery present at Second Manassas, and also of that present during the Sharpsburg campaign? The following is sent, with the hope that it may elicit additions. and corrections: At Second Manassas. On Jackson's wing. Attached to Jackson's Old Division, (Major L. M. Shumaker, Chief of Artillery).—Brockenbrough's Maryland Battery; Carpenter's Virginia Battery; Caskie's (Hampden Artillery); Poague's (Rockbridge Artillery); Raines's (Lee Artillery); Wooding's (Danville Artillery); Rice's; Cutshaw's—(8). Attached to A. P. Hill's Division, (Lieutenant-Colonel R. L. Walker, Chief of Artillery).—Braxton's (Fredericksburg Artillery); Crenshaw's; Davidson's (Letcher Artillery); Latham's (Branch Artillery); McIntosh's (Pee Dee Artillery); Pegram's (Purcell Artillery); Fleet's (Middlesex Artillery
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
s, and it did not seem commensurate with the abilities, nor altogether fitting to the tastes of a great commander who had so long dealt with the vast and active concerns of military life; but the suggestion was unanimously adopted, and Hon. John W. Brockenbrough, Rector of the board, was appointed to apprise General Lee of the fact. At first General Lee hesitated. He modestly distrusted his own competency to fulfill the trust, and he feared that the hostility of the government towards him migodern Languages, to which was added English Philosophy. In the second year of his incumbency the Chair of History and English Literature was established, and soon afterwards the department of Law and Equity, under that eminent jurist, Judge John W. Brockenbrough. Several other Chairs were included in the President's programme, one of the English Language, one of Applied Chemistry, and also A School of Medicine, a School of Journalism and a School of Commerce—the latter being designed to giv