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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 42 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 7 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for De Broglie or search for De Broglie in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
kfast, he having arrived last evening only, from Geneva, and whom I could not otherwise have seen. He is about fifty, a plain man in his manners and in his conversation, not affecting the appearance of a petit maitre, nor the reputation of a wit, like the Paris men of letters. We had a pleasant drive of five hours, and arrived in the afternoon at La Grange, near Rosoy, in the department of the Seine-et-Marne. It is the most venerable castle I have seen in France. The sweet little Duchess de Broglie was already there; more interesting than ever from her affliction, The death of Mad. de Stael. which, from her perfect openness of character, she hardly attempts to conceal. Coming with persons I knew so well, and to an establishment where everything is arranged as if on purpose for the most open hospitality, I soon felt, as it were, at home. It is impossible to know General Lafayette in Paris and the world without feeling respect for his enthusiasm of character, his unalterabl
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
Duchess de Grammont had a soiree for the Liberals every Saturday night, to which I always went before going to the Tuileries, in order to see and hear both sides together. The persons who came to it were merely a part of those who went to Mad. de Broglie's, and it was generally rather dull. . . . I went more frequently to the Duchess de Broglie's than anywhere else. She has the same tender, affectionate character she had when I saw her watching over her mother's failing health, the same opeor otherwise, nearly every day, and of all the men I have known, he is, in some respects, the most remarkable; the man on whom talent and knowledge have produced their best and most generous effects. . . . . The last day I was in Paris, Mad. de Broglie made a little dinner-party for me, to which she asked Humboldt, Forbin, De Pradt, The Abbe de Pradt, who, as Mr. Ticknor elsewhere says, of all others in French society, is said to have the most esprit in conversation. Lafayette, and two or
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
stando in diversos praticos, ou vous avez toujours revele votre excellent naturel, avec votre vaste érudition. II semble que notre Cesar Cesare Balbo. a renonce à cet exercice. Depuis qu'il est encorgado de negocios, il est devenu trop grave pour nous. Je sympathisais davantage avec la douceur de votre caractere, et de votre singuliere modestie. Mm. de l'ambassade, vous offrent milles compliments, et moi, je vous prie d'offrir un ancien hommage hereditaire, à; la jolie Duchesse de Broglie, que je crois aujourd'hui bien dedaignante pour mon souvenir. Conservez moi la fidelite de votre amitie, et de votre devise, Coelum non animum, et agreez l'assurance, de mes tendres sentiments. M. L. The Duke de Laval died at the age of seventy, three months before Mr. Ticknor reached Paris in 1837, so that they never met again. Count Cesare Balbo, the writer of the following letters, whose character and talents had attached and interested Mr. Ticknor, See ante, pp. 210, 212,