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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Mecklenburg (N. C.) Historical Society. (search)
, none but Southern troops were engaged. This war was unpopular at the North, and the defection of New England amounted almost to overt treason. Hence, the South furnished again more than her proportion of troops. Again, the Southern volunteers flocked North, while no Northern troops came South. If we read of the bloody battles in Canada, we are struck with the number of Southern officers there engaged, mostly general officers — Wilkinson, Izzard, Winder, Drayton, Hampton, Scott, Towson, Brooke, Gaines, &c. Kentucky, I believe, furnished more troops than any State for the invasion of Canada. On the authority of the Southern Review, I state, without investigating the truth of it, that Maryland furnished more of the naval heroes of the war of 1812 than did any other State in the Union. It is very certain that the South contributed more than her quota of land troops. Not only was the war popular at the South, but the laboring class being slaves, more of the citizen soldiery were ab
sensible men in the world now, and by every historian that will judge the deed hereafter. The Fourth Pennsylvania Regiment from the county of Montgomery, arrived at Washington from Annapolis. It is commanded by the following officers: Colonel, John F. Hartranft; Lieut. Col., Edward Schall; Major, Edwin Schall; Adjutant, Chas. Hunsicker; Quartermaster, Yerkes; Surgeon, Dunlop; Assistant-Surgeons, Christ and Rogers; Captains, Bolton, Schall, Chamberlain, Dunn, Snyder, Allabaugh, Amey, Brooke, Cooke, and Taylor. The regiment numbers about 900, and comprises a fine body of hardy yeomanry and artisans, who left their fields and shops to rally in defence of the National Capital.--National Intelligencer, May 9. The steam frigate Minnesota, the flag-ship of the blockading squadron, sailed from Boston, Mass.--Boston Transcript, May 8. A meeting in aid of the volunteers from Roxbury, Mass., was held in that city. Speeches were made by Rev. J. E. Bartholomew, Edward Everett
rdinance creating a State, reported by the select committee on a division of the State, this morning, by a vote of fifty to twenty-eight. The boundary as fixed includes the counties of Logan, Wyoming, Raleigh, Fayette, Nicholas, Webster, Randolph, Tucker, Preston, Monongahela, Marion, Taylor, Barbour, Upshur, Harrison, Lewis, Braxton, Clay, Kanawha, Boone, Wayne, Cabell, Putnam, Mason, Jackson, Roane, Calhoun, Wirt, Gilmer, Ritchie, Wood, Pleasants, Tyler, Doddridge, Wetzel, Marshall, Ohio, Brooke, and Hancock. A provision was incorporated permitting certain adjoining counties to come in if they should desire, by expression of a majority of their people to do so. The ordinance also provides for the election of delegates to a Convention to form a constitution; at the same time the question for a new State or against a new State shall be submitted to the people within the proposed boundary. The election is to be held on the 24th of October. The name of the new State is to be Kanawha.
the enemy have, with the exception of the fight with the Merrimac, attempted only the reduction of stone walls at Charleston. Successful in beating down brick and mortar, and reducing granite to atoms, their projectiles have been found powerless against sand-bags and heaps of rubbish. The only serious encounter that can be called a fair trial of iron-clads resulted in the destruction of the monitor Keokuk, by the superiority of our projectiles — steel bolts and spherical shot — devised by Brooke, the ingenious inventor of the deep-sea sounding-line. The Yankee gunboats occasionally, with their light draughts and powerful guns on pivots, have ascended our rivers with impunity, frightened the people on shore, and controlled the country for miles around. The prestige that attended them at first, and cost us so dear, has, however, completely vanished. Like every dreaded danger, they succumbed as they were fairly looked in the face. Now we know fully their vulnerability, and the peri
e by the fire of the fleet disabling the carriages. On December 25, six hundred shots were expended, exclusive of grape and canister. Detailed reports were made. Five guns were disabled by the fleet, making eight in all. Besides two seven-inch Brooke guns exploded, leaving thirty-four heavy guns on Christmas night. The last guns on the 24th and 25th were fired by Fort Fisher on the retiring fleet. In the first fight the total casualties were sixty-one. . . . . . . . . . . . . . I had nolonel Lamb, then commander of Fort Fisher, says there was but one gun out of twenty on the land face demolished, and out of his forty-four barbette guns,--that is, guns mounted on top of the works,--but three had been demolished, and two of them, Brooke's guns, had been exploded. He also says that at the first attack the fire of the fleet was desultory, and did but little harm, a large portion of the shells going clear over the fort into the water of the river. How was it at the second attac
melodies, with variations to suit the peculiar phases of South Carolina Jacobinism. More temperate counsels prevailed in Georgia, and the Savannah Republican, after commending the action of the Southern Confederacy in reviving the government and constitution of the fathers, calls upon the Congress to re-erect the stars and stripes as their national flag, and resume upon the Southern lyre those glorious old tunes, Hail Columbia, and The Star-spangled Banner. Yesterday this question came up in the Congress. Mr. Brooke, of Mississippi, protested that the stars and stripes were the idol of his heart, when Mr. Miles of South Carolina, who has been drawing his salary pretty regularly for several years from the federal government, said that he had always, even from the cradle, looked upon that flag as the emblem of tyranny and oppression. We sincerely trust that these fugitive States, after having stolen our constitution, will not claim also our flag.--Commercial Advertiser, Feb. 14.
her whole side. She was about eight hundred yards distant, and we were in just the position we most desired. The ram appeared to be steaming slowly, as if waiting for events, but using her guns rapidly all the time, throwing one hundred pounder Brooke's rifle shot and shell with spirit and energy. Fortune seemed most favorable, and our intrepid commander determined to close with our antagonist, seized the opportunity without hesitation, and ordering four bells again, and again repeated, as prght our foe was going down, and could hardly repress a shout of exultation in answer to the ringing cheer with which our comrades on the Wyalusing greeted our bold grapple with the monster. As we struck her, the ram drove a one hundred pounder Brooke's shot through and through her, from starboard bow to port side. Our stem was forced into her side, and keeping up our headway, we careened her down beneath our weight, and pushed her like an inert mass before us, while in profound silence our g
no move against any of them. Generals Gilmore and Baldy Smith both urged upon Butler the laying of pontoons across the Appomattox in order to advance on Petersburg, the key to Richmond. But Butler curtly replied that he would build no bridges for West Pointers to retreat over. Butler's signal tower The lookout The thirteenth New York heavy artillery idling in winter quarters at Bermuda hundred Butler bottled up The impassable James river The gun is in Confederate Battery Brooke — another of the defenses on the James constructed after Butler was bottled up. Here in 1865 the gunners were still at their posts guarding the water approach to Richmond. The Federals had not been able to get up the river since their first unsuccessful effort in 1862, when the hastily constructed Fort Darling at Drewry's Bluff baffled the Monitor and the Galena. Battery Brooke was situated above Dutch Gap, the narrow neck of Farrar's Island, where Butler's was busily digging his famous can
no move against any of them. Generals Gilmore and Baldy Smith both urged upon Butler the laying of pontoons across the Appomattox in order to advance on Petersburg, the key to Richmond. But Butler curtly replied that he would build no bridges for West Pointers to retreat over. Butler's signal tower The lookout The thirteenth New York heavy artillery idling in winter quarters at Bermuda hundred Butler bottled up The impassable James river The gun is in Confederate Battery Brooke — another of the defenses on the James constructed after Butler was bottled up. Here in 1865 the gunners were still at their posts guarding the water approach to Richmond. The Federals had not been able to get up the river since their first unsuccessful effort in 1862, when the hastily constructed Fort Darling at Drewry's Bluff baffled the Monitor and the Galena. Battery Brooke was situated above Dutch Gap, the narrow neck of Farrar's Island, where Butler's was busily digging his famous can
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
r hundred yards, five Napoleons were placed. These positions, separated by a body of timber, were about 1,400 yards from the enemy's batteries, strongly posted on an eminence. Immediately on my right were the batteries of the First corps. My battalion being necessarily separated, that part of it next to Pegram's position, consisting of three of Wyatt's and two of Graham's guns, was placed in charge of Captain Wyatt, while Captain Ward was directed to superintend the guns of his own and of Brooke's battery. About seven o'clock on the morning of the 3d, while I myself was at the position occupied by Captain Ward, the guns under Captain Wyatt opened on the enemy's position. In a few minutes the fire of several of their batteries was concentrated on these five guns, and seeing that the contest was a very unequal one, and not knowing the origin of the order for opening, I directed the firing to cease! I afterwards ascertained that Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill had ordered it. In thi
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