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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 122 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 21 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 18 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 17 1 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 13 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for John M. Brooke or search for John M. Brooke in all documents.

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Rains of the Confederate ordnance service. In the lower photograph is an old cast-iron Columbiad, strengthened at the Tredegar Iron Works at Richmond, by the addition of iron bands, after the manner of the Brooke heavy artillery invented by John M. Brooke, formerly of the United States navy, the designer of the ironclad Virginia--better known as the Merrimac. The gun in the middle of the second photograph is a light Brooke rifle — a 3-inch gun. Its length was about seventy inches, the diameterojectile was ten pounds with a powder charge of one pound. The maximum effective range of these guns was 3,500 yards, and the time of flight fifteen seconds, with an elevation of fifteen degrees. Imported from France Rifles invented by John M. Brooke, C. S. N. An old Columbiad iron bands added: Confederate cannon — imported, manufactured, adopted and invented In the arsenals captured from the Federals, there were about one hundred and twenty thousand muskets of old types, and twelve
able were put to work at once by the chief engineer, Colonel J. F. Gilmer, all obstructions removed from the front of the works, the parapets of some of the heavier batteries made stronger, and the lines of infantry cover connecting the redoubts improved. Big guns near Richmod. The narrow reach of the James is swept in both directions by the gun in the upper picture — a large Brooke rifle, made at the Tredegar Iron Works in the Confederate Capital. The gun below is a Columbiad with Brooke reinforcement. It is mounted within Fort Darling, and points down the James toward Chaffin's Bluff, visible beyond the bend to the left. Drewry's Bluff commanded this portion of the river so completely that it was chosen as the site of the first hastily constructed defenses of Richmond in 1862, and was subsequently so strengthened as to be almost impregnable. The guns there mounted remained the guardians closest to the Capital on the James until the withdrawal of Lee with his remnant of t