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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 5 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for William Brooke or search for William Brooke in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
The right flank at Gettysburg. Colonel William Brooke-Rawle. It is but natural that the battle which proved to be the turning point of the Rebellion should attract more attention, and be more thoroughly studied, than any other. To some, it may seem eating to reconciliate in the day to discuss a new phase of that fearful strter has been received which, in justice to Mr. Bachelder, is now given in full: office of the Chief of engineers, Washington, D. C., December 10th, 1878. Colonel William Brooke-Rawle, Sir-Your letter of 13th ultimo, transmitting an account of the operations of the cavalry command of General David McM. Gregg during the battle ortment to plot the positions of the troops on the maps of Gettysburg battlefield, and has been returned endorsed as follows: In answer to the letter of Mr. William Brooke-Rawle, I have the honor to say that it is to be regretted that from the removed position of the field of operations of Gregg's Cavalry, it was found impract
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Gregg's cavalry at Gettysburg (search)
Stuart in the actual battle. Knowledge of this is certainly essential to a correct understanding of the great struggle. One might imagine that Major McClellan's assertion had been thrust forward as a feeler, to ascertain whether there was any one to take up the gauntlet for General Gregg and his command, who, for many years, have rested content with their achievements without boasting, and, if there were none ready to do so, to claim unequivocally a victory. The very able paper of Colonel Brooke-Rawle, on The right flank at Gettysburg, which appears in this series, furnishes the reader a careful, reliable, and truthful account of the engagement between Gregg and Stuart. Let us examine by the light of the official reports of the commanding officers of the contending forces these conflicting statements, and discover where the victory really remained, or who was defeated-Gregg or Stuart. General Gregg, in his official report, dated July 25th, 1863, to Lieutenant Colonel A.