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Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 26 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: books for children (search)
Indians without a thought of preparing boys for social service. Meanwhile, writers more serious in purpose had been following the historical and biographical trail of Goodrich and Abbott, bringing to it more literary nicety and greater research. An early contemporary of the two had been John Frost (1800– 59), a forgotten schoolmaster whose one hundred juveniles sold by the ton in his day and were republished as late as 1890. John Abbott (Jacob's brother), followed by James Parton, Elbridge Brooks, E. E. Hale, and Hezekiah Butterworth, made important contributions to the new department of biography for children. These and other writers, among them Edward Eggleston See also Book III, Chap. XI. and George Cary Eggleston, began also to combine history and fiction so well that the reader did not know where one left off and the other began. This species they developed more successfully than did their extremely popular English rivals, Henty and his school. Their fiction was more
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
., 261 Bridge, the, 41 Bridge, Horatio, 19, 21 Brier Wood Pipe, the, 286 Brigade must not know, Sir, the, 307 Briggs, C. F., 61, 167, 249, 250, 251 Bristol, Augusta Cooper, 286 British Empire in America, 107 Broadway journal, the, 59, 61 Brock, Sallie A., 301 Brook Farm, 14, 20, 21, Brookfields, the (friends of Thackeray), 232 Brooklyn Eagle, the, 262 n., 263, 264, 270 Brooklyn Freeman, 264 Brooklyniana, 269 Brooklyn standard, 269 Brooklyn Union, 270 Brooks, Elbridge, 404 Brooks, Noah, 400, 405 Broomstick Train, the, 237 Brotherhood, 328 Bother Jonathan, 187 Brother Jonathan's lament for sister Caroline, 279 Brown, Alice, 390 Brown, Charles Brockden, 162 Brown, John, 6, 279 Browne, Charles Farrar, 157, 158, 159 Browne, Francis F., 303, 304 Browne, Sir, Thomas, 124, 349 Brownell, Henry Howard, 277-278, 279, 281, 282, 284, 285 Brownie books, 408 Browning, Elizabeth Barrett, 252 Browning, Robert, 137, 245 Brown of Os
itten. The world never needed a man like Elbridge Brooks more than it needed him when he was taken A man of high ideals and tireless energy, Mr. Brooks could not be other than a useful man in the cret of the influence for good exerted by Elbridge Brooks lay in the fact that he always spoke and ious faith in the truth as he sees it. Elbridge Brooks was a man who tried to do his full duty a we have crossed the bar; and the name of Elbridge Brooks will linger long in the memory of those wed young writers. In the same way, he said, Mr. Brooks had words of encouragement for young authors and their influence continually increases. Mr. Brooks once said to me: My desire is to write histoks wrote forty such books. The memory of Elbridge Brooks is one that will smell sweet and blossom e interestingly of the life and character of Mr. Brooks. Mr. Brooks, he said, has done an inteMr. Brooks, he said, has done an intellectual work of great value to mankind. He knew, as many do not dream or imagine, something of the[3 more...]