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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. 6 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
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93, aged 85; his w. Rebecca d. in 1698. After his marriage to Mrs. Green he resided in Holmes Place, about midway between its northeasterly angle and North Avenue, until the house was destroyed by fire about 1681 or 1682 after which, with the exception of a very short residence in Watertown, he probably occupied the estate on the east side of Holmes Place, afterwards owned by Steward Hastings and still later by the Rev. Dr. Holmes. 2. Thomas, of Concord, perhaps s. of Thomas (1), m. Hannah Brooks 13 Dec. 1657, and d. 12 Ap. 1658, leaving wid., and chil. Eliphalet, Elizabeth, and others not designated by name in his will. Bond (Hist. Watertown, p. 765) conjectures that this person was identical with Thomas (1), and Savage (Gen. Diet., II. 197) doubts. But the record of his death in 1658, which describes him as husband of Hannah, settles this point beyond all question, though it does not indicate what relationship, if any, he sustained to the other Thomas who survived until 169
93, aged 85; his w. Rebecca d. in 1698. After his marriage to Mrs. Green he resided in Holmes Place, about midway between its northeasterly angle and North Avenue, until the house was destroyed by fire about 1681 or 1682 after which, with the exception of a very short residence in Watertown, he probably occupied the estate on the east side of Holmes Place, afterwards owned by Steward Hastings and still later by the Rev. Dr. Holmes. 2. Thomas, of Concord, perhaps s. of Thomas (1), m. Hannah Brooks 13 Dec. 1657, and d. 12 Ap. 1658, leaving wid., and chil. Eliphalet, Elizabeth, and others not designated by name in his will. Bond (Hist. Watertown, p. 765) conjectures that this person was identical with Thomas (1), and Savage (Gen. Diet., II. 197) doubts. But the record of his death in 1658, which describes him as husband of Hannah, settles this point beyond all question, though it does not indicate what relationship, if any, he sustained to the other Thomas who survived until 169
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1., Literal copy of Births, deaths, and Marriages in Medford from earliest records. (search)
ts daughter of Jonathan tufts and Rebeka his wife born February ye 7th. 1707 John Secomb sone of peter secomb and hannah his wife dyed may 27: 1707 Ebenezer Francis Sone of John Francis and lydya his wife born march 25 170 7/8 Abigail Hall daughter of thomas hall and abigall his wife born october 24 1708 John Secomb sone of peter secomb & hannah his wife Born Aprill 25th 1708 Stephen Bradshoe sone of John Bradshoe & mary his wife born november 16th 1707 March 10. 1709: Hannah Brooks wife of calebbrook decesed. Samll. Tufts Sun ofcapt Petter Tufts and mercy his wife borne the 26 of September 1709: The above Sd Samll Tufts died the 3 day of october next folowinge in ye year 1709 Simon Bradshow Sun of Ensn John Bradshow and mary his wife borne the 3 day of october 1709 Eliott Whitmore Sone of Frances whitmore & Anna his wife born 13 of march 1709 & dyed ye 16 of said month Mary dill daughter of Thomas dill and mary his wife borne the 25 of october 1706
It was built on the banks of the Mystic, probably not far from the governor's house, at the Ten Hills. It was a bark of 30 tons, built of locust cut on the governor's farm, and was called the Blessing of the Bay. It was launched July 4, 1631. Mr. Brooks finds that it cost 145 pounds, and that the owner said of it, in 1636, I will sell her for 160 pounds. Now hear Mr. Brooks: There was something singularly prophetic that the first vessel built at Mistick should have increased in price after 5 Mr. Brooks: There was something singularly prophetic that the first vessel built at Mistick should have increased in price after 5 years service. Our day has seen the prophecy fulfilled; as it is no marvel now for a Medford ship to command a higher price after having had a fair trial at sea. Well, I don't know; to me it seems very like the case of a trader who marks up his goods, thinking that thereby he increases the value of his stock. We have no information that the governor ever got his 160 pounds. I sincerely hope he did. Our excellent historian, whom I thoroughly love, is a little apt to lapse into rhapsody when h