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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance on the City of Mexico-battle of Contreras-assault at Churubusco-negotiations for peace-battle of Molino del Rey-storming of Chapultepec-San Cosme-evacuation of the City-Halls of the Montezumas (search)
described, I saw some United States troops pushing north through a shallow ditch near by, who had come up since my reconnaissance. This was the company of Captain Horace Brooks, of the artillery, acting as infantry. I explained to Brooks briefly what I had discovered and what I was about to do. He said, as I knew the ground and hBrooks briefly what I had discovered and what I was about to do. He said, as I knew the ground and he did not, I might go on and he would follow. As soon as we got on the road leading to the city the troops serving the gun on the parapet retreated, and those on the house-tops near by followed; our men went after them in such close pursuit — the troops we had left under the arches joining — that a second line across the road, about half-way between the first and the garita, was carried. No reinforcements had yet come up except Brooks's company, and the position we had taken was too advanced to be held by so small a force. It was given up, but retaken later in the day, with some loss. Worth's command gradually advanced to the front now open to it
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance on Cold Harbor-an anecdote of the war- battle of Cold Harbor-correspondence with Lee-Retrospective (search)
gained the outer rifle-pits in its front. The ground over which this corps (18th) had to move was the most exposed of any over which charges were made. An open plain intervened between the contending forces at this point, which was exposed both to a direct and a cross fire. Smith, however, finding a ravine running towards his front, sufficiently deep to protect men in it from cross fire, and somewhat from a direct fire, put [James H.] Martindale's division in it, and with [William T. H.] Brooks supporting him on the left and [Charles, Jr.] Devens on the right succeeded in gaining the outer-probably picket --rifle-pits. Warren and Burnside also advanced and gained ground — which brought the whole army on one line. Near Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864, 7 A. M. Major-General Meade, Commanding A P. The moment it becomes certain that an assault cannot succeed, suspend the offensive; but when one does succeed, push it vigorously and if necessary pile in troops at the successful point from
13, 1865. Babbitt, E. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Babcock, O. E., Mar. 13, 1865. Bache, H., Mar. 13, 1865. Badeau, Adam, Mar. 2, 1867. Barriger, J. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Beckwith, E. G., Mar. 13, 1865. Bell, George, April 9, 1865. Bingham, J. D., April 9, 1865. Blake, Geo. A. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Bomford, Jas. V., Mar. 13, 1865. Bonneville, B. L. E., Mar. 13, 1865. Bowers, Theo. S., April 9, 1865. Bradley, L. P., Mar. 2. 1867. Breck, Samuel, Mar. 13, 1865. Brewerton, H., Mar. 13, 1865. Brooks, Horace, Mar. 13, 1865. Brown, N. W., Oct. 15, 1867. Buell, Geo. P., Mar. 2, 1867. Burbank, Sid., Mar. 13, 1865. Burke, Martin, Mar. 13, 1865. Burns, Wm. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Burton, H. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Cady, Al., Mar. 13, 1865. Callender, F. D., April 9, 1865. Card, Benj. C., Mar. 13, 1865. Carrington, H. B., April 9, 1865. Churchill, Sylvanus, Feb. 23, 1847. Clary, Rbt. E., Mar. 13, 1865. Clitz, Henry B., Mar. 13, 1865. Craig, Henry K., Mar. 13, 1865. Crane, Chas. H., Mar. 13, 1
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, I. List of officers from Massachusetts in United States Navy, 1861 to 1865. (search)
redit, Roxbury.Maas.Mass.Mass.Nov. 22, 1861.Actg. Master.Hydrangea; Honeysuckle.So. Atlantic; E. GulfMar. 19, 1862.Appointment revokedActg. Master Oct. 30, 1863.Actg. Master's Mate.Sept. 19, 66Actg. Ensign Aug. 30, 1864.Actg. Ensign.Hon. discharged. Brooks, Everett W.,Mass.Mass.Mass.June 12, 1863.Actg. Asst. Paymr.Howquah.East Gulf.Oct. 25, 1865.Hon. discharged.Actg. Asst. Paymr. Brooks, G. H.,N. Y.Mass.Mass.Oct. 29, 1861. ,Gunner.De Soto.East Gulf.Nov. 29, 1862.Dismissed.Gunner. Brooks, Horace, Credit, Chesterfield.Mass.Mass.Mass.Mar. 30, 1863.Actg. Master's Mate.Bermuda; Proteus.Supply Ship; E.Aug. 20, 1865.Hon. discharged.Actg. Ensign. Oct. 12, 1864.Actg. Ensign.Gulf. Brooks, Samuel A., Credit, Tisbary.Mass.Mass.Mass.Jan. 12, 1863.Actg. Master's Mate.Bohio.West Gulf.Dec. 16, 1865.Hon. discharged.Actg. Ensign. Dec. 4, 1863.Actg. Ensign. Brow, William H.,Mass.Mass.Mass.Nov. 28, 1862.Actg. 3d Asst. Engr.State of Georgia.North Atlantic.Dec. 4, 1863.Appointment revoked
, Assistant Adj. General, Feb. 28, 1877. Colonel, Assistant Adj. General, Aug. 31, 1893. Briggs, Henry Shaw. Born at Lanesborough, Mass., Aug. 1, 1824. Captain, 8th Infantry, M. V. M., in service of the U. S., Apr. 30, 1861. Colonel, 10th Mass. Infantry, June 10, 1861. Present at the battle of Williamsburg. Wounded and disabled at the battle of Fair Oaks. Brig. General, U. S. Volunteers, July 17, 1862. Mustered out, Dec. 4, 1865. Died at Pittsfield, Mass., Sept. 22, 1887. Brooks, Horace. Born at Boston, Mass., Aug. 14, 1814. Cadet, U. S. Military Academy, July 1, 1831, to July 1, 1835. Brevet Second Lieutenant, 2d U. S. Artillery, July 1, 1835. Second Lieutenant, Dec. 28, 1835. Brevet First Lieutenant, Dec. 31, 1835. First Lieutenant, Feb. 8, 1837. Captain, June 18, 1846. Brevet Major, Aug. 20, 1847. Brevet Lieut. Colonel, Sept. 8, 1847. In defence of Washington, D. C., Feb.–Mar., 1861. Major, Apr. 28, 1861. At Fort Pickens, Fla., Apr. to Oct., 1861. Lieut. Colo
862, to Dec. 8, 1862. Major, Additional Paymaster, U. S. Volunteers, Nov. 26, 1862. Brevet Lieut. Colonel, U. S. Volunteers, Dec. 27, 1865. Mustered out, Apr. 1, 1869. Major, Paymaster, U. S. Army, July 25, 1875. Died, Apr. 3, 1884. Brooks, Edward. Born in Massachusetts. Acting Assistant Surgeon, U. S. Army, June, 1862. First Lieutenant, Assistant Surgeon, U. S. Army, Aug. 19, 1862. Brevet Captain and Major, U. S. Army, Mar. 13, 1865. Died at Rockdale, N. Y., Apr. 19, 1866. Brooks, Horace. See General Officers. Brown, Edward Augustus. Born in Massachusetts. First Lieutenant, Regimental Quartermaster, 53d Mass. Infantry, Dec. 15, 1862. Mustered out, Sept. 2, 1863. Captain, Commissary of Subsistence, U. S. Volunteers, May 28, 1864. Brevet Major, U. S. Volunteers, Sept. 1, 1865. Mustered out, Oct. 9, 1865. Brown, Harvey Ellicott. Born in New York. Appointed from Massachusetts. First Lieutenant, Assistant Surgeon, 70th N. Y. Infantry, June 29, 1861. Major,
5. G. O. 65, June 22, 1867. Brodhead, Major J. A., Additional Paymaster, U. S. Volunteers, to be Lieut. Colonel, U. S. Volunteers, by brevet, for faithful services in his department, to date from Dec. 27, 1865. G. O. 65, June 22, 1867. Brooks, Assistant Surgeon Edward, U. S. Army, to be Captain, U. S. Army, by brevet, for faithful and meritorious services during the war, to date from Mar 13, 1865. G. O. 71, Aug. 31, 1866. — Brevet Captain Edward, Assistant Surgeon, U. S. Army, to be Major, U. S. Army, by brevet, for faithful and meritorious services during the war, to date from Mar. 13, 1865. G. O. 71, Aug. 31, 1866. Brooks, Colonel Horace, of the 4th U. S. Artillery, to be Brig. General, U. S. Army, by brevet, for meritorious services during the Rebellion, to date from Mar. 13, 1865. G. O. 71, Aug. 31, 1866. Brown, First Lieutenant C. H. C., Adjutant of the 7th U. S. Colored Infantry, to be Captain, U. S. Volunteers, by brevet, for gallant and meritor
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, Index of names of persons. (search)
, G., 577 Broad, Ira, 580 Brock, O. S., 20 Brodhead, J. A., 403, 509 Bronson, David, 250 Brookhouse, Robert, 580 Brooks, A. O., 250 Brooks, E. W., 20 Brooks, Edward, 403, 509 Brooks, F. D., 250 Brooks, G. H., 20 Brooks, G. H., 580 Brooks, Horace, 20 Brooks, Horace, 171, 403, 510 Brooks, John, Jr., 250 Brooks, S. A., 20 Brotherson, J. C., 250 Brow, W. H., 20 Brown, A. B., 485 Brown, Benjamin, 580 Brown, B. H., 250 Brown, C. A., 20 Brown, C. E., 160 Brown, C. H., 20 BrownBrooks, Horace, 171, 403, 510 Brooks, John, Jr., 250 Brooks, S. A., 20 Brotherson, J. C., 250 Brow, W. H., 20 Brown, A. B., 485 Brown, Benjamin, 580 Brown, B. H., 250 Brown, C. A., 20 Brown, C. E., 160 Brown, C. H., 20 Brown, C. H., 20 Brown, C. H. C., 485, 510 Brown, D. F., 250 Brown, D. L., 250 Brown, D. L., 250 Brown, D. R., 20 Brown, E. A., 250, 403, 510 Brown, E. Y., 485 Brown, F. D., 578 Brown, F. F., 378 Brown, F. H., 20 Brown, F. H., 605 Brown, F. T., 250 Brown, G. F., 250 Brown, G. H., 20 Brown, G. S., 250 Brown, G. T., 250 Brown, G. W., 250 Brown, G. W., 606 Brown, H. A., 20 Brown, H. A., 20 Brown, H. A., 250, 510 Brown, H. E., 403, 460, 510 Brown, H. W., 378, 485 Brown, H. W., 460
and sang very sweetly. And her son, Capt. Horace Brooks, writes: Whatever charm there may be inn to white silk stockings and slippers. Captain Brooks also pays a tribute to his mother's scholaime. On Zophiel; or, The Bride of Seven, Mrs. Brooks' fame as a poetess rests. Southey, The Dopoetesses. Zophiel is an Oriental epic. Mrs. Brooks finds the suggestion for her plot in the Ap happily consummated. On this ancient myth Mrs. Brooks enlarges in her poem Zophiel. The first the poem. In the poems Judith and Esther Mrs. Brooks has merely attempted the description of twooung blooming morning's fragrant breath. Mrs. Brooks' one novel, Idomen, is interesting not onlych from the vivid fancy of some painter. Mrs. Brooks seemed not to have had the spirit of the reHilliard. / 1820. Zophiel. / A Poem. By Mrs. Brooks. / Boston. / Published by Richardson & LordIdomen. Clearly a thinly-veiled account of Mrs. Brooks' own life; but it is impossible to separate
Deacon Samuel Train. [This brief memoir is the substance of a most enjoyable informal talk by Mr. Hall at a Saturday evening gathering in the rooms of the Medford Historical Society.] IT is remarkable that neither Brooks's nor Usher's history makes any mention of Deacon Samuel Train, who was for many years a well-known and highly respected citizen of Medford. He was born at Weston, Mass., on the twenty-first of July, 1781. I am indebted to Mr. Train's daughter Rebecca (Mrs. George H. Lemist, of Sheffield) for much valuable information. I quote from her letter, dated May 23, 1899: He was a man of few words, but he was always interested in all the young men, who enjoyed his quaint and bright chat on different subjects. I wish I could do his character justice, but we never value our parents until they are gone or until we ourselves are nearing the close of life. The memories of those days are sweet and precious. I am hardly the one to write of my father. To me he was a
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