Your search returned 61 results in 21 document sections:

1 2 3
dominant dominant issue between the two National parties, and urged the duty of abolishing Slavery as a reason for supporting Gen. Taylor. Mr. Washington Hunt Then a Whig member of Congress; since, Governor of New York. wrote an elaborate letter to Ohio, urging the duty of standing by Whig principles by electing Gen. Taylor, and by choosing at the same time members of Congress who would inflexibly resist, and legislate to prohibit, the Extension of Slavery. At no time previously, Mr. James Brooks, Editor of The New York Express, reported to the New York Whig State Convention of 1847 (October 6th), an Address condemning the objects of the Mexican War then raging, which was unanimously adopted. In the course of it, he said: Fellow Citizens: Disguise the Mexican War as sophistry may, the great truth cannot be put down, nor lied down, that it exists because of the Annexation of Texas; that from such a cause we predicted such a consequence would follow; and that, but for that ca
and friends. A most wanton and brutal personal assault May 22, 1856. on Senator Sumner, of Massachusetts, by Representative Brooks of South Carolina, abetted by Representatives Keitt, of South Carolina, and Edmundson, of Virginia, doubt-less cothor had therein unwarrantably assailed and ridiculed Judge Butler--one of South Carolina's Senators, and a relative of Mr. Brooks--he was assaulted by surprise while sitting in his place (though a few minutes after the Senate had adjourned for the d and take a voyage to Europe, where, under the best medical treatment, his health was slowly restored. The infliction on Brooks, by a Washington court, of a paltry fine Of $300. for this outrage, tended to deepen and diffuse popular indignation at the North, which the unopposed reelection of Brooks — he having resigned, because of a vote of censure from a majority of the House — did not tend to allay. Of Fremont's aggregate vote--1,341,812--it is probable that all above 1,200,000 was given
ss., 106; appoints Samuel Hoar as Commissioner to Charleston, 180. Bright, Jesse D., of Ind., 197. Brinckerhoff, Jacob, of Ohio, 189. Brodhead, John, his letter to Jeff. Davis, 278. Brolaski, Capt., (Union,) killed at Belmont, 597. Brooks, James, speech on the Mexican War, 200. Brooks, Preston S., assails Senator Sumner, 209. Brown, Aaron V., sends T. W. Gilmer's letter to Gen. Jackson, 158. Brown, Albert G., of Miss., visits Buchanan, 277: his interview, 278; 373. BroBrooks, Preston S., assails Senator Sumner, 209. Brown, Aaron V., sends T. W. Gilmer's letter to Gen. Jackson, 158. Brown, Albert G., of Miss., visits Buchanan, 277: his interview, 278; 373. Brown, B. Gratz, at Chicago Convention, 321. Brown, Col., (Union,) at Chicamicomico, 600. Brown, Col. Harvey, at Fort Pickens, 601. Brown, David Paul, 126. Brown, Frederick, killed by Martin White, 284. Brown, Gov. Joseph E., of Ga., speech at Convention, 337; his Message, urging Secession, 347. Brown, John, at the battle of Black Jack, 244; 279; his early life, 280 to 282; what Redpath says of him, 282-3; at the battle of Osawatomie, 284; his speech at Lawrence, 284-5; he releas
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brooks, James, 1810-1873 (search)
Brooks, James, 1810-1873 Journalist; born in Portland, Me., Nov. 10, 1810; became a Washington correspondent of the Portland Advertiser in 1832; established the Express in New York City in 1832; was a member of the New York State constitutional convention; a government director of the Union Pacific Railway; and one of the members of the House of Representatives censured for his connection with the Credit Mobilier. He died in Washington, D. C., April 30, 1873. See Credit Mobilier.
Boynton, H. V., II, 426, 433, 435. Bradley, Luther P., I, 613-615. Bragg, Braxton, I, 456, 471, 477, 479, 481, 484-486, 488, 490; II, 80, 131, 146, 151. Branch, Mr., I, 87. Breckinridge, Joseph C., I, 484, 485, 488. Brewerton, Henry, I, 46, 60. Brewster, A., II, 395. Bridgham, Thomas, I, 10. Britton, Emily, II, 566. Brock, Mr., I, 496, 497. Brodhead, J. M., .1, 356. Brooke, Fort, Fla., I, 73, 77, 88. Brooke, John R., I, 187, 244, 246, 247, 300, 317. Brooks, James, II, 200. Brooks, Phillips, II, 558. Brown, Harvey, I, 85, 86. Brown, J. M., 11, 216, 267. Brown, John, I, 153; II, 170. Brown, Levi R., I, 49. Brown, Lieutenant Colonel, I, 369. Brown, Orlando, 11, 215, 217, 232, 233, 283, 284, 347. Buck, R. P., I, 125, 128; II, 545. Buckingham, Maurice, I, 313. Buell, D. II., I, 135. Buell, Don Carlos, 1,188,456; II, 169. Buell, G. P., I, 588, 603. Buford, John, I, 260, 398-401, 403, 406, 407, 412, 413, 415, 416, 418,
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
98. Brannan, General, 264, 269, 280, 303. Breckenridge, General, 153, 365. Breck, Major, Samuel, 252. Breeze, Sidney, 104. Bridgeport on the Tennessee, 254, 256, 274, 275, 277, 278, 283, 284, 291. Brisbane, Albert, 45, 48. Bristol, 234. Bristow, Benjamin H., 418, 435, 436. British Guiana, 471. Broderick, Senator, 153. Bronson, candidate for governor, 128. Brook Farm, 26, 30-39, 41, 43-49, 53, 57, 58, 60, 63, 94, 134, 432, 453, 454, 482; Dana's address on, appendix. Brooks, James, 487. Brooks, Preston S., 487. Brown, B. Gratz, 428. Brown, John, 21, 153, 154. Brown, Joseph E., governor, 367. Brown's Ferry, 283, 284, 291. Brownson, Orestes, 453. Bruinsburg, 216. Bruno, 56. Bryan, William J., 490, 492. Bryant, William Cullen, 484. Buchanan, President, 148, 149, 152. Buckner, General, 188. Buell, General, 350. Buffalo, 3, 5, 6, 8-10, 12, 16, 17, 23, 27, 30. Bullard, Ann, 1. Bull Run, 166, 168, 171, 175, 178, 263. Burke, orthodox minister, 22.
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Lydia Maria child. (search)
lled down. This bit of levy from the future Professor of Theology I find in the excellent sketch of Dr. Francis, by Rev. John Weiss, his successor,--a little book which gives a good impression of the atmosphere in which the brother and sister were reared. Their earliest teacher was a maiden lady, named Elizabeth Francis,--but not a relative — and known universally as Ma'am Betty. She is described as a spinster of supernatural shyness, the never-forgotten calamity of whose life was that Dr. Brooks once saw her drinking water from the nose of her tea-kettle. She kept school in her bedroom; it was never tidy, and she chewed a great deal of tobacco; but the children were fond of her, and always carried her a Sunday dinner. Such simple kindnesses went forth often from that thrifty home. Mrs. Child once told me that always, on the night before Thanksgiving, all the humble friends of the household,--Ma'am Betty, the washer-woman, the berry-woman, the wood-sawyer, the journeymen-bakers,
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton. (search)
hat body. The Anti-slavery standard, with genuine commendation, said, The electors of the Eighth District would honor themselves and do well by the country in giving her a triumphant election. The other candidates in the same district were Mr. James Brooks, Democrat, and Mr. LeGrand B. Cannon, Republican. The result of the election was as follows: Mr. Brooks received thirteen thousand eight hundred and sixteen votes, Mr. Cannon eight thousand two hundred and ten, and Mrs. Stanton twenty-four.Mr. Brooks received thirteen thousand eight hundred and sixteen votes, Mr. Cannon eight thousand two hundred and ten, and Mrs. Stanton twenty-four. It will be seen that the number of sensible people in the district was limited! The excellent lady, in looking back upon her successful defeat, regrets only that she did not, before it became too late, procure the photographs of her two dozen unknown friends. In the summer of 1867, the people of Kansas were to debate, and in the autumn to decide, the most novel, noble, and beautiful question ever put to a popular vote in the United States,the question of adopting a new Constitution whose p
niscences. Butler's book. A review of his legal, political and military career. Boston, 1892. 8°. — Farewell address to the army of the James. Dated Jan. 8, 1865. 2 pp. 16°. Butler, Benjamin Franklin, con. Speech upon the campaign before Richmond, 1864, delivered at Lowell, Mass., Jan. 29, 1865. With an appendix: The two attacks on Fort Fisher; Speech on the treatment of the negro, delivered at Boston, Feb. 4, 1865; Speech of Hon. George S. Boutwell in reply to charges of Hon. James Brooks of New York against Gen. Butler, delivered in the House of Representatives, Jan. 24, 1865. Boston, 1865. 88 pp. 8°. — Life and public services. Philadelphia, 1864. 16°. — Hudson, H. N. A chaplain's campaign with Gen. Butler. New York, 1865. 8°. — – Gen. Butler's campaign on the Hudson. 2d ed. With an appendix. Boston, 1883. 8°. — Parton, James. Gen. Butler in New Orleans; with a sketch of the previous career of the general, civil and military. New York, 186
Mayor's Court, Saturday. --Joshua, slave of Dan'l. Truehart, ordered fifteeen lashes for striking Jas. Brooks with a stone, in the street. William, slave of Jno. Freeland, ordered twenty-five lashes for fighting in the street and attempting to resist D. J. Saunders, who stopped the proceeding.--Albert Wallace, charged with drunkenness, was acquitted. --Wm. White, drunk and asleep in the First Market, admonished and discharged.
1 2 3