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s; an illustration which the writer of this witnessed. He said once to his first cousin, Mrs. Jonathan Brooks, I wish to make a bargain with you. I will promise to be with you when you are sick, and s, she performed the last sad duty of closing his eyes in death. A very dangerous illness of Mrs. Brooks occurred, while he, as Governor, was engaged at Boston by the sitting of the Legislature. In and Gentlemen,--I am most happy, in visiting the town of my old brother-soldier and friend, General Brooks, to be received with so kind a welcome. You speak of some compensation. Compensation! Sir,pt my grateful acknowledgments for this cheering welcome. The procession soon arrived at General Brooks's house, escorted by the Medford Light Infantry; and, after the introduction of a few friend When President Monroe visited Boston in 1817, he said he had read the inaugural speech of Governor Brooks with entire approbation; and then added, I am willing to take the principles of that speech
s fear. But the angel came during a season of apparent insensibility, and life ceased Dec. 12, 1822. Thus, at the age of seventy-six, closed his ministry of more than forty-eight years. He baptized 853 persons; married 359 couples; admitted to the church 304 communicants; and officiated at 990 funerals. Every arrangement for a public funeral which respect for their venerable pastor could suggest was made by the town; and their Committee for the occasion were Messrs. Abner Bartlett, Jonathan Brooks, Thatcher Magoun, Turell Tufts, and Dudley Hall. The funeral services were on Saturday, Dec. 14. The prayer was offered by President Kirkland ; and the sermon preached by Dr. Abiel Holmes, from 2 Tim. IV. 6, 7. The pall-bearers were the Rev. Drs. Kirkland and Holmes, of Cambridge; Ripley, of Concord; Foster, of Brighton; Fiske, of West Cambridge ; and Homer, of Newton. The wife of Dr. Osgood died Jan. 7, 1818, aged seventy, and left behind the memorial of an amiable, intelligent,
arrant was issued, and the first meeting held at the time specified; and Abner Bartlett, Esq., was chosen Clerk; Messrs. Jonathan Brooks, John Symmes, Darius Wait, Nathan Adams, jun., and John King, Parish Committee; Messrs. J. Richardson, John Howe05 funerals; and admitted 26 communicants to the church. The parish-committee, consisting of Messrs. John Symmes, Jonathan Brooks, and John King, engage Mr. Caleb Stetson, a graduate of Harvard College in 1822, to preach as a candidate for five seen thus promptly made. The committee chosen to build the house were Messrs. Abner Bartlett, Peter C. Brooks, and Jonathan Brooks, Esqs. It was built immediately, at the cost of $3,824.05, and was acceptable to pastor and people. Fund.--This mmittee report, that they find the act incorporating trustees passed the 9th of March, 1827; and it appears that Messrs. Jonathan Brooks, Nathaniel Hall, Turell Tufts, Dudley Hall, Nathan Adams, John Symmes, jun., and Jonathan Porter, were incorpora
siness. Tanning was vigorously pursued, with a great outlay of capital, by Mr. Ebenezer Hall, on land a few rods south-west of the Episcopal church; and by Mr. Jonathan Brooks, on land near Marble Brook, now owned by Mr. Noah Johnson. The first tan-yard in Medford was on the corner lot south-east of Whitmore's Bridge. It was bounded on the east by the brook, on the west by Lowell Street, and on the north by High Street. It was last owned by Mr. Nathan Tufts and Mr. Jonathan Brooks, in company. When they sold it, Mr. Tufts moved to Charlestown, and became the most extensive manufacturer of leather in the State. At Baconville, now in Winchester, Medfordock Hill and the Lowell Railroad Bridge. In that yard, Samuel Francis made bricks as early as 1750, and sold them at ten shillings per thousand (lawful money). Mr. Brooks carried on the manufacture in 1760, and sold them at fifteen shillings. Mr. Stephen Hall was the next occupant of that yard, which has been discontinued since 1
g the three excavations. The first, on the southern brow of Rock Hill, was a hole four feet deep and four feet in diameter, and was enclosed within a small circular furrow dug in the earth. The work was done in the night. The second, in Mr. Jonathan Brooks's land, was within thirty feet of the river, and was small in circumference, and quite deep. The third was within ten feet of the river, by the bathing-rock. It disclosed a cave walled up on each side, and arched; its length about six fee1810.--Medford had a large choir of volunteer singers, under the faithful Ephraim Bailey. On Sunday, once, the pitch-pipe set the pitch so high that the whole choir broke down. Still, Bailey tried on the second verse, and again broke down. General Brooks could not endure it any longer; and he rose in his pew, beckoned to Bailey, and said, Hadn't you better take another pitch? Bailey replied, No, sir: I guess we can get through it. 1811, May 13.--Voted to instruct the representative of Med
. He had four children,--Joseph, Elizabeth, Ruth, and Susanna. Joseph was the father of Mrs. Jonathan Brooks; Ruth was the mother of Governor Brooks; and Susanna, the mother of Captain John Pratt. Governor Brooks; and Susanna, the mother of Captain John Pratt. The grandsons were called John, in honor of their grandfather, John Albree. Of the first settler's descendants, the only ones who remained in Medford were Mrs. Jonathan Brooks and Governor Brooks; aMrs. Jonathan Brooks and Governor Brooks; and, through life, they were drawn towards each other by the tenderest ties. Collateral branches of the Albree family. N. B. The records of those who married among the Brookses will be found in thGovernor Brooks; and, through life, they were drawn towards each other by the tenderest ties. Collateral branches of the Albree family. N. B. The records of those who married among the Brookses will be found in that family record.  1-5SUSANNA m. Mr. Goldthwait, who d. six months after, without children. She m., 2d, John Pratt, of Chelsea, Dec. 6. 1753, and had--   Thomas, b. m. Anne Cheever; has son Thomas of Boston, probably the son of John, as above, m. Sarah Peirce, of Medford, Aug. 18, 1724.  1Brooks, Thomas, the first of the name in New England, came, it is supposed, from Suffolk, England, and
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers killed in action. (search)
nassas, Va.,Aug. 30, 1862. Broad, Lyman,57th Mass. Inf.,Preble's Farm, Va.,Sept. 30, 1864. Broadbent, Charles W., Corp.,18th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May 6, 1864. Brock, Francis B.,25th Mass. Inf.,Cold Harbor, Va.,June 3, 1864. Brock, John M.,13th Mass. Inf.,Gettysburg, Pa.,July 1, 1863. Brock, Orville,24th Mass. Inf.,Tranter's Creek, N. C.,June 5, 1862. Bronseau, Peter,34th Mass. Inf.,Cedar Creek, Va.,Oct. 13, 1864. Brooks, Asa D.,16th Mass. Inf.,Fair Oaks, Va.,June 18, 1862. Brooks, Jonathan,16th Mass. Inf.,Fair Oaks, Va.,June 18, 1862. Brooks, Levi,10th Mass. Inf.,Fair Oaks, Va.,May 31, 1862. Brooks, Richard,20th Mass. Inf.,Glendale, Va.,June 30, 1862. Brooks, Stephen F., Sergt.,36th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 12, 1864. Brotgers, Lewis,57th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 12, 1864. Brown, Abraham,54th Mass. Inf.,James Island, S. C.,July 12, 1863. Brown, Charles,55th Mass. Inf.,Honey Hill, S. C.,Nov. 30, 1864. Brown, Charles A. Name and rank. Pr
c. 11, 1862. Britton, James H.,18th Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,Aug. 30, 1862. Broad, Lyman,57th Mass. Inf.,Preble's Farm, Va.,Sept. 30, 1864. Broadbent, Charles W., Corp.,18th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May 6, 1864. Brock, Francis B.,25th Mass. Inf.,Cold Harbor, Va.,June 3, 1864. Brock, John M.,13th Mass. Inf.,Gettysburg, Pa.,July 1, 1863. Brock, Orville,24th Mass. Inf.,Tranter's Creek, N. C.,June 5, 1862. Bronseau, Peter,34th Mass. Inf.,Cedar Creek, Va.,Oct. 13, 1864. Brooks, Asa D.,16th Mass. Inf.,Fair Oaks, Va.,June 18, 1862. Brooks, Jonathan,16th Mass. Inf.,Fair Oaks, Va.,June 18, 1862. Brooks, Levi,10th Mass. Inf.,Fair Oaks, Va.,May 31, 1862. Brooks, Richard,20th Mass. Inf.,Glendale, Va.,June 30, 1862. Brooks, Stephen F., Sergt.,36th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 12, 1864. Brotgers, Lewis,57th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 12, 1864. Brown, Abraham,54th Mass. Inf.,James Island, S. C.,July 12, 1863. Brown, Charles,55th Mass. Inf.,Honey Hill, S. C.,Nov. 30, 1864.
501 Brightman, J. L., 337 Brightman, W. R., 601 Bringolf, Jacob, 337 Brinley, Nathaniel, Jr., 501 Briody, James, 337 Britt, O. C., 501 Britt, William, 444 Britton, C. L., Jr., 444 Britton, J. H., 337 Britton, Z. L. P., 501 Brizzee, J. W., 501 Broad, Lyman, 337 Broadbent, C. W., 337 Broadbent, James, 501 Brock, F. B., 337 Brock, J. M., 337 Brock, Orville, 337 Brockway, H. D., 444 Bronseau, Peter, 337 Brooke, J. R., 119 Brooks, A. D. , 337 Brooks, Albert, 444 Brooks, Jonathan, 337 Brooks, L. C., 490 Brooks, Levi, 337 Brooks, Richard, 337 Brooks, S. F., 337 Brooks, S. H., 444 Brooks, T. B., 88 Brotgers, Lewis, 337 Brown, Sergt., 74 Brown, A. L., 444 Brown, A. W., 444 Brown, Abraham, 337 Brown, Alexander, 501 Brown, B. F., 444 Brown, C. A., 1st Mass. Inf., 338 Brown, C. A., 20th Mass. Inf., 502 Brown, C. B., 444 Brown, C. H., 26th Mass. Inf., 338 Brown, C. H., 56th Mass. Inf., 436 Brown, C. L., 444 Brown, Charles, 337 Brown, D. B., 444 Br
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3., The Evolution of the Medford public Library. (search)
raise subscriptions of money and collections of books, and that said committee should possess discretionary power (subject to the fundamental principle of the Library) to accept or reject such books as should be offered for gift or deposit, and to act until in a meeting of the subscribers, a set of rules be formed and the proper officers be chosen by them for managing the concerns of the Institution.—The committee chosen were (from the Church) Brothers Jonathan Porter, Nathaniel Hall, Jonathan Brooks, Nathan Adams, John Symmes, jr., and (from the Cong.) Messrs. Dudley Hall, Turrell Tufts, Abner Bartlett, Joseph Swan, Ebenezer Hall, jr., and Isaac Sprague. The meeting was then dissolved. This last date, as you see, was September, 1825. I have been unable, as yet, to find any report of that committee as to the success of their mission; but there is in the possession of the Public Library the financial record of the Medford Social Library, from April, 1826, to January, 1856, at
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