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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. 8 0 Browse Search
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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1., Literal copy of Births, deaths, and Marriages in Medford from earliest records. (search)
f october 1699 John Bradstret & mercy wade were maried the 22 day of november 1699 Jacob sheppard & mercy Chickering maried The 22 day of August 7000 Jacob sheppard sone of Jacob Sheppard & mercy his wife was Born the 29 day of August 1700 Samuell Bradshoe sone of John Brad hoe & Mary his wife Born the 3 day of Sebtemb 1700 Samuell Brooks sone of Samuell Brooks & Sarah his wife Born the eight of october 1700 Jemimah hall the daughter of John Hall & Jemimah his wife born (To be continued.)f october 1699 John Bradstret & mercy wade were maried the 22 day of november 1699 Jacob sheppard & mercy Chickering maried The 22 day of August 7000 Jacob sheppard sone of Jacob Sheppard & mercy his wife was Born the 29 day of August 1700 Samuell Bradshoe sone of John Brad hoe & Mary his wife Born the 3 day of Sebtemb 1700 Samuell Brooks sone of Samuell Brooks & Sarah his wife Born the eight of october 1700 Jemimah hall the daughter of John Hall & Jemimah his wife born (To be continu
the corporation to a board of thirteen members, who were to choose a president and vice-president from their own number, the entire board subject to annual election. Boston capitalists subscribed freely, and Russell, Gore, Barrell, Craigie, and Brooks appear among the earliest directors. This board organized on the 11th of October by the choice of James Sullivan as president and Colonel Baldwin and John Brooks (afterwards Governor Brooks) as vice-presidents. The first step was to make the neGovernor Brooks) as vice-presidents. The first step was to make the necessary surveys between the Charlestown basin and the Merrimac at Chelmsford; but the science of engineering was in its infancy in New England, and it was difficult to find a competent person to undertake the task. At length Samuel Thompson, of Woburn, was engaged to make a preliminary survey; but the directors, not wholly satisfied with his report, afterwards secured the services of Samuel Weston, an eminent English engineer, then employed in Pennsylvania in the Potomac canals. With good in