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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 136 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
s and titles were cheaply won in that war. Brooks's relation to Butler, the senator, was remote,, p. 1365.) The easy and informal way in which Brooks communicated his purpose to Edmundson, accordiust descended on his way from the Capitol. At Brooks's request for a conversation, they took a seateading from Pennsylvania Avenue to the steps. Brooks then said that Sumner had been very insulting n said further that in this first conversation Brooks repeated what Sumner had said about South Carothe passage had not yet been issued. Besides, Brooks at no time claimed that he had read it in the day before,— Edmundson going to the House, and Brooks to the Senate. The two mornings had passed, a. 1357; Iverson's, p. 1364; Foster's, p. 1356. Brooks afterwards said in his loose way that he desishirteen feet off. Toombs looked on, commending Brooks's act. Remarks, May 27, Congressional Globett told Edmundson that he could not leave till Brooks did. when it began was standing behind the Vic[58 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
ccessfully engaged in the medical practice. In 1898 he was serving his third term as commander of Sumter camp. Ulysses Robert Brooks, clerk of the supreme court of South Carolina, and a veteran of the Sixth South Carolina cavalry, is a descendant of a noted and patriotic Southern family. His great grandfather was Zachariah Smith Brooks, a lieutenant in the Revolutionary army under Gen. William Butler, who married a sister of this general after the close of the war, and had one son, Whitfield Brooks. The latter married Mary Parsons Carroll, and one of their sons was Preston S. Brooks, congressman previous to the Confederate era. James Carroll Brooks, father of Ulysses Robert, married a daughter of Col. U. M. Robert, of Mount Pleasant, Barnwell district, and during the great war commanded a company of South Carolina State troops. The subject of this sketch was born at Mount Pleasant, October 27, 1846, and was reared at the home of his parents in Edgefield district. On December 3,