Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Brooks or search for Brooks in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
the enemy. Smith, being hastily recalled by his chief, has barely time to throw Hancock's brigade on Richardson's right, to extend his line by resting it upon a thicket, which the enemy will presently take from him, and at the same time to send Brooks' brigade to the extreme left. The latter general arrives just in time to occupy the wood stretching along the road, and to reinforce Burns' troops, of Sedgwick's division, who are keeping up an unequal fight from their position across this road.parture, has with his wonted vigor hurled his own and McLaws' division against the weakest point of the Federal line. He almost breaks it, when the opportune arrival of the reserve of Sumner, who had soon recovered from his surprise, checks him. Brooks re-establishes the battle on that side; but the struggle continues with fierceness along the whole line until after sunset. The Confederates, encouraged by their victory of Gaines' Mill, and finding that their adversary is about to escape them,
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
mity of the wood to the east to attack the right of McLaws. The first line advanced boldly; but while it was gaining ground the second was exposed to an enfilading fire, proceeding from the wood, which threw the inexperienced soldiers of Morris into confusion. Kimball proceeded past them and deployed on Weber's left. Richardson arrived immediately after French, and extended his line still more to the left with Meagher's Irish brigade, supported at a short distance by those of Caldwell and Brooks. The ground upon which these two divisions were about to fight was interspersed with natural and artificial obstacles. It is intersected by the hollow way which, as we have already said, connected the cross-road coming from Dunker Church with the Sharpsburg and Keedysville road. To the north-east of this hollow way—that is to say, nearer the Federals—stood the Roulette farm, surrounded by cultivated fields; on the other side, within a few hundred metres of the Hagerstown pike, and neare
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
enew the experiment. Burnside was not responsible for the failure of this last attempt, and could find no fault with any of his lieutenants. But irritated and discouraged by this misfortune, he could no longer bear the criticisms, which he had not heeded until then, and which he finally read in the very silence of his humblest soldiers as well as his most zealous officers. He had determined to put an end to this state of things, and he requested the President to dismiss Generals Hooker, Brooks, Newton and Cochrane from the service of the United States, and to deprive Generals Franklin, Smith, Sturgis and Ferrero and Colonel Taylor of their respective commands. This would be to strike a crushing blow at those whom the army had learned to consider as its bravest and most experienced leaders. By signing such an order Mr. Lincoln would have disorganized the entire army. No serious cause for complaint was alleged against these officers to justify such punishment, except that they d
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
teries, 16 guns. 1st Brigade, Brigadier-general Hancock, 4 regiments. 2d Brigade, Brigadier-general Brooks, 5 regiments. 3d Brigade, Brigadier-general Davidson, 4 regiments. 3d Divisions, Brigade, Taylor; 3d Brigade, Bartlett. 2d Division, Smith. 1st Brigade, Hancock; 2d Brigade, Brooks; 3d Brigade, Davidson. 6th corps, F. Porter; 19,960 men strong. 1st Division, Morrell. 1sBrigade, Taylor; 3d Brigade, Bartlett. 2d Division, Smith. 1st Brigade, Hancock; 2d Brigade, Brooks; 3d Brigade, Davidson. 6th corps, F. Porter. 1st Division, Morrell. 1st Brigade, Martinda, Reno (afterward Cox); 13,819 men strong. 1st Division, Cox. 1st Brigade, Crook; 2d Brigade, Brooks; 3d Brigade, Scammon. 2d Division, Wilcox. 1st Brigade, ......; 2d Brigade, ..... 3d Divisirigade, Torbert; 3d Brigade, Bartlett. 2d Division, Smith. 1st Brigade, Hancock; 2d Brigade, Brooks; 3d Brigade, Irwin. Independent Division, Couch. 1st Brigade,......; 2d Brigade, ...... 7