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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. W. Brooks or search for J. W. Brooks in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
roposed to record the roll as soon as the same can be as nearly perfected as possible. Any assistance from the survivors of the company in furtherance of this undertaking will be gladly received. Adress either William H. Smith, late captain of company, or J. C. Carrington, Smithville, Va. The roll. Roll of Company K, 18th Virginia Infantry, known as The Charlotte Rifles: Ezekiel V. Adams;——Adkins. William Dennis Bouldin, orderly, captured at Gettysburg; William H. Bailey; Dr. J. W. Brooks, G. W. Barksdale; W. G. Baldwin, lieutenant, died in service;——Brown; Jim Bailey; John Barksdale. Wiltshire Cardwell, disabled in first battle of Manassas; George George Chappell; C. C. Chappell; John H. Cook, died in service; M. L. Covington, second lieutenant and then captain, wounded at ——; James A. Calhoun; John Calhoun, wounded at Gettysburg; James T. Crawley, wounded at Gettysburg; J. J. Cook, wounded at Gaines' Mill; Thomas Carter; W. J. Chappell, killed at Drewry's Bluf
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Thomas R. R. Cobb. (search)
to make a little speech. At Greensboro Oscar Dawson told me he had raised in two days a company of eighty men, and they wanted to be on the field in one week from the day he began. At Conyers they have raised the sixth company in Newton county. In Merriweather they raised three companies of eighty men in three days and $7,000 to equip them. Similar news comes up from the whole country. At West Point yesterday afternoon a large crowd assembled at the cars, and had speeches from Keitt, Brooks (of Mississippi), Ben Hill and Gus Wright. They called on me, but I declined on the ground it was Sunday, and took occasion to give them a five minute's lecture on Sabbath-breaking. It was the only speech that was not cheered. There is a good deal of talk about going to Richmond. I would not be surprised if the whole Government were moved there as soon as the Virginia delegates arrive and join us. The President favors it decidedly. I sent you a copy of his message. It is a capital docu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard. (search)
eached Graham with the 29th regiment and the remainder of the 21st regiment; at daylight Colonel Gaillard with the 27th regiment of the brigade, arrived, raising his command to 1,500 men. General Bushrod Johnson, at Drewry's Bluff, a few miles beyond, hearing Graham's firing, had marched to his aid also, and arrived during the night, with his brigade of J,168 Tennesseans. On the morning of the 7th General Butler sent forward against the Confederate advance at Walthall a division under General Brooks, of five brigades, with the usual proportion of artillery, and supported by cavalry. The action that ensued was open-field fighting and severely contested. Hagood's command of 1,500 men lost: 22 killed; 132 wounded, and 13 missing; Bushrod Johnson's loss was slight—7 men wounded from shell fire. Before dark the enemy withdrew to their now fortified base at Bermuda Hundred, and the Confederates slept upon the field. Of the affair at Walthall General Beauregard subsequently was pleased