Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Thomas L. Broun or search for Thomas L. Broun in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
amous war-horse Traveller, was formerly owned by Captain John S. Brown. He was owned by Major Thomas L. Broun, of Charleston, W. Va., and the following sketch of the horse, written by that gentleman its pedigree, which was obtained as above mentioned and sent by my brother to General Lee. Thomas L. Broun. Charleston, W. Va., August, 1886. From Gen. Fitzhuigh Lees book on Gen. Robert E. Lee, born near Blue Sulphur Springs, in West Virginia, and was purchased by General Lee from Major Thomas L. Broun, who bought him from Captain James W. Johnson, the son of the gentleman who reared him. ia and afterwards in South Carolina, and was greatly pleased with his appearance. As soon as Major Broun ascertained that fact the horse was offered the general as a gift, but he declined, and MajorMajor Broun then sold him. He was four years old in the spring of 1861, and therefore only eight when the war closed. He was greatly admired for his rapid, springy walk, high spirit, bold carriage and mu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General R. E Lee's war-horse: a sketch of Traveller by the man who formerly owned him. (search)
al R. E Lee's war-horse: a sketch of Traveller by the man who formerly owned him. It has been incorrectly stated some time ago that General Lee's famous war-horse Traveller, was formerly owned by Captain John S. Brown. He was owned by Major Thomas L. Broun, of Charleston, W. Va., and the following sketch of the horse, written by that gentleman for the Richmond Dispatch, in 1886, is worthy of reproduction: Gen. R. E. Lees war-horse. In view of the fact that great interest is felt in thbeen added by General Lee to the price I gave for the horse in September, 1861, to make up for the depreciation in our currency from September, 1861, to February, 1862. In 1868 General Lee wrote to my brother stating that his horse had survived the war and was known as Traveller (spelling the word with a double l in good English style), and asking for its pedigree, which was obtained as above mentioned and sent by my brother to General Lee. Thomas L. Broun. Charleston, W. Va., August, 1886.