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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, State of (search)
Hawkins1st to 3d1789 to 1795 Samuel Johnston1st to 2d1789 to 1793 Alexander Martin3d to 6th1793 to 1799 Timothy Bloodworth4th to 7th1795 to 1801 Jesse Franklin6th to 9th1799 to 1805 David Stone7th to 9th1801 to 1807 James Turner9th to 14th1805 to 1816 Jesse Franklin10th to 13th1807 to 1813 David Stone13th to 14th1813 to 1815 Nathaniel Macon14th to 20th1815 to 1828 Montford Stokes14th to 18th1816 to 1823 John Branch18th to 21st1823 to 1829 James Iredell20th to 22d1828 to 1831 Bedford Brown21st to 26th1829 to 1840 Willie P. Mangum22d to 24th1831 to 1836 Robert Strange24th to 26th1836 to 1840 William A. Graham26th to 28th1840 to 1843 Willie P. Mangum26thto 33d1840 to 1854 William H. Haywood28th to 29th1843 to 1846 George E. Badger29th to 34th1846 to 1855 David S. Reid33d to 36th1854 to 1859 Asa Biggs34th to 35th1855 to 1858 Thomas L. Clingman35th to 36th1858 to 1861 Thomas Bragg36th1859 to 1861 37th, 38th, and 39th Congresses vacant. Joseph C. Abbott40th to 4
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
f the general hospitals of the army of General R. E. Lee, Confederate States Army, Petersburg, Va. Medical Inspector, Charles Wm. Penn Brock, M. D., Richmond, Va., formerly surgeon P. A. C. S. Department of North Carolina-Medical Director, Bedford Brown, M. D. Medical Inspector, S. S. Satchwell, M. D., Wilmington, N. C. Edward Warren-Bey, lately deceased at Paris, formerly medical director of Army of North Carolina during the war 1861-65. Department of South Carolina—Medical Director, Pey V. Maryland-Medical Director, Julian J. Chisholm, M. D., Baltimore, Md. VI. Virginia-Medical Director, John Herbert Claiborne, M. D., Petersburg, Va.; Medical Inspector, Chas. Wm. Penn Brock, Richmand, Va. VII. North Carolina—Medical Director, Bedford Brown, M. D.; Medical Inspector, S. S. Satchwell, M. D., Wilmington, N. C., and Edward Warren—Bey, M. D. (lately deceased). VIII. South Carolina—Medical Director, Peyre Porcher, M. D., Charleston, S. C.; Medical Inspectors, A. M. Talle
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate dead in Stonewall Cemetery, Winchester, Va. Memorial services, June 6, 1894. (search)
s blown up, and he escaped by swimming ashore. To him belonged the honor of capturing the celebrated pirate, La Fitte. From such stock Major Thomson came, and in him a noble ancestry warranted the expectation of a noble life. His martial spirit was perhaps first displayed at Harper's Ferry, during the John Brown raid in 1859. In company with his father, he took part in the fight that occurred there between the citizens and the insurrectionists. As they came near the engine house which Brown was holding, Dr. Thomson, his father, directed him to shoot from under cover. No sir, replied the boy, No dodging for me; I go right along with the rest. Early manifesting a taste for military life, James Thomson was entered as a cadet at the Virginia Military Institute the year before the breaking out of the war, and here the reports of the impending conflict first reached him. He was of course eager for the fray, and soon left school and entered the army, being assigned to duty at first
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
naval war, it was as nothing to that of the Confederacy. The latter had at its disposal a small number of trained officers, imbued with the same ideas, and brought up in the same school as their opponents. Some of these, like Buchanan, Semmes, Brown, Maffit, and Brooke, were men of extraordinary professional qualities; but, except in its officers, the Confederate Government had nothing in the shape of a navy. It had not a single ship of war. It had no abundant fleet of merchant vessels in ruary, 1862, though breasting a forlorn hope, showed the same spirit that won him deserved promotion, in the successful career of the Albemarle, in the engagements of April 19, and May 5, 1864, in Albemarle Sound. Zzzaction of the Arkansas. Brown (in the ill equipped Arkansas), on the Mississippi River, July 15, 1862, ran the gauntlet of the Federal fleet of four ironclads, eight rams, four gunboats, and two ships of war; inflicted much damage to the enemy, put two of their vessels ashore
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The prison experience of a Confederate soldier. (search)
re's department, but was under the immediate command of Colonel Brown, of New York, and was garrisoned by his regiment of infantry, which had seen service in the field. Colonel Brown was not only an accomplished and humane officer, but was a kind ane North for money and clothing, the latter especially. Colonel Brown's kindness was highly appreciated by us, and the prison But, to our great disappointment, and to the regret of Colonel Brown himself, we were allowed to enjoy his hospitality and kput in force we understood that the blankets ordered by Colonel Brown, and quantities of clothing and other articles for the hout clothing except the scanty supply brought with us, Colonel Brown explained the situation to us, and expressed regret thawere killing them for food. Some complaint was made to Colonel Brown, but to no purpose. The Colonel himself had a fine pete person and for the bed. It is proper to state that Colonel Brown and his command were ordered to the front before the re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
geon Breysacher at Tupelo, at $100 per month, left in Harodsburg, Ky. Put on duty at Corinth. Brown, H. W., Surgeon. Special Order, No. 129, Tupelo, July 22, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, Atlanta, Ga., Fairnear Tallahassee, Fla., March 11, ‘63. Notification from the Surgeon-General of resignation. Brown, Thos. Lewellen Briteberry, Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary War, 2d June, ‘63, to rank 18, ‘63. Sep. 30, ‘63, 63d Virginia Regiment, Headquarters A. T., Dalton, Ga., March 4, ‘64. Brown, B. F., Surgeon, Sep. 30, ‘63, 2d S. C. Regiment. Boulware, J., Assistant Surgeon, Sep. 30, ‘63, 6th S. C. Regiment. Bozeman, J. J., Assistant Surgeon, Sep. 30, ‘63, Hampton's Legion. Brown, J. R. Assistant Surgeon, Sep. 30, ‘63, 3d Arkansas Regiment. Bowers, J. A., Surgeon, May 3, g. Passed Board Dec. 8, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, 45th Tennessee Regiment, Oct. 12, ‘63, relieved with Brown's Brigade and ordered to report to Gen. Cheatham for duty with Polk's Corps
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
ly, commanding the Second Corps, to be ready to move at 3 A. M. on the morrow with that corps and with Nelson's and Braxton's Artillery Battalions, and General A. L. Long as chief of artillery. Their orders were to move to the Valley, strike Hunter, destroy him if possible, and threaten Washington. Not aware that Hunter had advanced as far as Lexington, for the telegraph wires had been cut, his instructions to Early were to move by way of Louisa Court House and Charlottesville, and through Brown's or Swift Run pass in the Blue Ridge, as he might deem most advisable, strike Hunter's force in the rear and, if possible, destroy it. Then to move down the Valley across the Potomac at Leesburg or at or near Harper's Ferry, as he might deem most desirable, and threaten Washington city. General Breckinridge was to co-operate. The battle-scarred and battle-worn veterans destined for this undertaking contained the men who, under Stonewall Jackson, had won the name of the Foot Cavalry of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Va. Proceedings at the Annual Meeting, Dec. 13, 1894; officers of, 334; some present at, 281 Atkinson, Col., John Wilder, 49. August, Col., Thos, P., 49. Aylett, Col Wm. R. His address; Women of the South, 54. Baldwin, Col. John B., Inspector-General of Virginia, 48. Bennett, Hon. R. T., late Colonel 14th N. C. Infantry, C. S. A., 81. Bernard, George S., 69. Blockades, Importance of, 89. Blue and Gray, Blending of the, 67. Boynton, Gen. H. V., 67. Bronaugh, Wm., 46. Brown. Col., Commandant of Fort Pulaski, 140. Buchannan, C. S. N., Admiral Franklin, 77. Burgwyn, Col. H. K.; killed, 123. Burnside, Gen. A. E., 130. Cadets Va. Military Institute, 341. Cardwell, Col. D., 147. Cary, Col. John B., 386. Cassville, Battle of, 6. Causes of the War; Slavery and States' Righs; Exposition by Hon. Jos. Wheeler, 24. Cave, D. D., Rev. Robert C. His noble vindication of the South, 359. Cedar Creek, Battle of, 306. Chancellorsville, Battle of, 288.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
ce, and General Barringer, were just as pronounced as were those of Judge Mangum. All of the old line Whigs opposed the war, while some of the Democrats, like Bedford Brown, denied the right to secede. V. Action of North Carolina Assembly, 1860-‘61. With such sentiments as these from her leading men it is hardly a matter of nnell; Bladen, Thomas D. McDowell; Brunswick, Thomas D. Meares; Caldwell, Edmund W. Jones (?); Camden, Dennis D. Ferebee; Carteret, Charles R. Thomas; Caswell, Bedford Brown; Chatham, J. H. Headen, John Manning, L. J. Merritt; Cumberland, Warren Winslow, Malcolm J. McDuffie (?); Davidson, B. A. Kittrell; Duplin, Joseph T. Rhodes; EJuly 1861, the dominating influence of the University was still more powerfully felt. Four men were nominated for the senatorships: George Davis, W. W. Avery, Bedford Brown and Henry W. Miller. They were all University men. Seven others received votes without a formal nomination; five of these, W. A. Graham, Thomas Bragg, William
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Wounded at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
William Payne, major 7th Virginia Regiment; discharged from the residence of William S. Peachy. L. Williams, colonel 1st Virginia Regiment; discharged from the residence of Mrs. Lucy Tucker. S. Reeve, lieutenant 1st Regiment Virginia Infantry; discharged from the residence of Mrs. Lucy Tucker. James Dooley, 1st Regiment Virginia Infantry; discharged from the residence of Mrs. Lucy Tucker. V. Taliaferro, 11th Regiment Virginia Infantry; discharged from the residence of Mrs. Lucy Tucker. W. L. Wingfield, Company D, 20th Regiment Virginia Infantry; discharged from the residenct of R. W. Hansford. I. S. Wright, Company B, 8th Regiment Virginia Infantry; discharged from the residence of R. W. Hansford. Captain Brown, died at the residence of R. W. Hansford, May 6, 1862. C. H. McKnight, Company A, 17th Virginia Infantry; wounded and lost right arm. Recovered. John Humphries, captain Company A, 17th Virginia Infantry; died in the Episcopal church at Williamsburg.
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