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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 76 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 74 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 6 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brown, Charles Brockden, 1771-1810 (search)
Brown, Charles Brockden, 1771-1810 Author; born in Philadelphia, Jan. 17, 1771: studied law, but abandoned it for literature. In addition to novels and works of literature he published An address to Franklin: an address to Congress on foreign commerce. He was the first American author who made literature his profession. He died in Philadelphia, Feb. 22, 1810.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 3: Girlhood at Cambridge. (1810-1833.) (search)
nce, recorded in her Summer on the Lakes as having occurred to a certain fabled Mariana; and she received from her teachers a guidance so kind and tender as to make her grateful for it during all her life. She returned from this school in the spring of 1825, being then just fifteen. At this time she lived, as always, a busy life,rose before five in summer, walked an hour, practiced an hour on the piano, breakfasted at seven, read Sismondi's European literature in French till eight, then Brown's Philosophy till half past 9, then went to school for Greek at twelve, then practiced again till dinner. After the early dinner she read two hours in Italian, then walked or rode; and in the evening played, sang, and retired at eleven to write in her diary. This, be it observed, was at the very season when girls of fifteen or sixteen are, in these days, on their way to the seashore or the mountains. The school where she recited Greek was a private institution of high character in Cambrid
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 9: a literary club and its organ. (search)
6. Children were reared, from the time they learned their letters, on Miss Edgeworth and Mrs. Trimmer, whose books, otherwise excellent, were unconsciously saturated with social conventionalisms and distinctions quite foreign to our society. Mrs. Lydia Maria Child, the leader in the now vast field of American literature for children,--and afterwards one of the leaders in that other experiment of the American novel,--was then a young woman, and the fellow-student of Margaret Fuller. Charles Brockden Brown, Irving, Cooper — these were our few literary heroes. Fortunately for Margaret Fuller, she had been led by the political tastes of her father to turn from the weaker side of American intellect, which then was literature, to the strong side, which was statesmanship. She had thus learned that there was a department of American life which was not derivative and apologetic, but strong and self-relying; and she was just in the mood to be a literary pioneer. What is called the Transc
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 12: books published. (search)
ortant aspects of that new world. It also excited interest in some quarters through the episodes themselves, especially that of Mariana, which was taken to be autobiographical, as it partly was; although the character of Sylvain, Mariana's supposed lover, was almost wholly imaginary, as the following letter will show :-- As to my book, there are complimentary notices in the papers, and I receive good letters about it. It is much read already, and is termed very entertaining! Little & Brown take the risk, and allow a percentage. My bargain with them is only for one edition; if this succeeds, I shall make a better. They take their own measures about circulating the work, but any effort from my friends helps, of course. Short notices by you, distributed at Philadelphia, New York, and even Cincinnati, would attract attention and buyers!! Outward success in this way is very desirable to me, not so much on account of present profit to be derived, as because it would give me advan
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Index. (search)
rd. Barlow, D. H., 39. Barlow, Mrs. D. H., letters to, 39, 54, 62, 94, 154. Barlow, F. C., 39. Barrett, Miss. See Browning. Bartlett, Robert, 138. 144, 146. Bartol, C. A., 142, 144. Beck, Charles, 33. Belgiojoso, Princess, 236. Baranger, J. P. de, 230. Birthplace of Madame Ossoli, 20. Bolivar, Simon, 15. Bonaparte, Napoleon, 13, 15. Bracebridge, Mr. and Mrs., 224. Bradford, George P., 144. Brentano, Bettina. See Arnis Briggs, Miss, 225. Brook Farm, 173. Brown, Charles Brockden, 132. Brown, Samuel, 226. Brown's Philosophy studied, 24. Browne, M. A., 39. Browning, Elizabeth (Barrett), 220, 314. Browning, Robert, 19, 69, 220, 229. Brownson, 0. A., 142-144, 147, 148. Brutus, defense of, 47-50. Bryant, William Cullen, 131. Buckingham, J. T., 77. Bull, Ole, 211. Burges, Tristam, 87. Burleigh, Charles, 176. Burns, Robert, 226. C. Cabot, J. E., 159. Cambridge, Mass., between 1810 and 1830, 32. Campbell, Thomas, 290. Carlyle-Emerson
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. Carl Van Doren, Ph.D., Head Master of The Brearley School, Henry Brackenridge. modern Chivalry. Charles Brockden Brown. Alcuin. Arthur Mervyn. Wieland. O Removed from the scenes of his old solitude, Brown became less solitary. Smith's friends, among . L. Mitchill, James Kent, and William Dunlap, Brown's future biographer, who belonged to a club caqual in extent Caleb Williams, a book in which Brown saw transcendant merits. In spite of the firsthe souls of those who study and reflect. But Brown was too good a democrat to write for geniuses hese were cases of speculative pathology which Brown had met in his morbid twilights, beings who hatory rich in incident suffer a sad confusion. Brown was no match for Godwin in the art of calm andesque or dramatic. In Edgar Huntly, for which Brown was considerably indebted to the memory of Skyolar or conscious man of letters. But, unlike Brown, he had been trained in the world. Born at Bu[27 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
, 153 Bread and Cheese Club, 297 Brewster, Benjamin H., 222 Brief account of the Agency of the Honorable John Winthrop, a, 152 Brief remarks on the defence of the Halifax libel, etc., 128 Brillon, Mme., 100 Bristed, John, 293 British prison ship, the, 182 British review, the, 206 British spy in Boston, the, 237 n. Broker of Bogota, 222,224 Brook Farm, 339-340, 345 Brooke, Henry, 165 Brother Jonathan, 309 Brothers, Thomas, 207 Brougham, John, 232 Brown, Charles Brockden, 287-292, 293, 295, 307, 308, 313 Brown, David Paul, 223 n., 224--John, 344 Brown, T. A., 227 n. Browne, Sir, Thomas, 104, 322 Browning, 261, 264, 266, 268, 274 Brownson, Orestes A., 333 Bruce, P. A., 216 n. Brutus, 220, 224 Bryant, Dr., Peter, 263 n. Bryant, W. C., 150, 163, 180, 183, 212, 240, 260-278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283 Buccaneer, the, 278 Buch, Leopold von, 187 Buckingham, J. S., 190 Buckingham, J. T., 236 n. Buckminster, Rev., Joseph Ste
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 4 (search)
o that man is. On the other hand, the things which these wise men do not know are constantly surprising, at least to a survivor of the less specializing period. I have had a professor of political economy stop me in the street to ask who Charles Brockden Brown was; and when I suggested to a senior student who was seeking a lecturer for some society that he might ask John Fiske, he replied that he had never heard his name. Now, I knew all about Charles Brockden Brown before I was twelve years oCharles Brockden Brown before I was twelve years old, from Sparks's American biography, and it was not easy to see how any one could read the newspapers, even three or four years ago, and not be familiar with the name of John Fiske. Yet this specialization extends, in truth, to all classes of the community. A Boston lawyer, the other day, told a friend of mine that, in his opinion, the Harvard professors were less eminent than formerly. My friend replied with truth that the only difference was that they were less likely to be all-round men,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
c, Charles, 322. Blanc, Louis, 304, 305, 309, 316, 317, 318, 320, 321, 322. Boarding-schools, Dangers of, 22. Boccaccio, Giovanni, 77. Borel, General, 307. Boswell, James, 15. Bowditch, H. I., 176. Bowditch, Nathaniel, 50. Bowen, Francis, 53, 54. Boyesen, H. H., 314. Bremer, Fredrika, 011. Brentano, Bettine, 25, 92, 93. Briggs, the Misses, 119. Bright, John, 327. Brook Farm, 83, 84, 120. Brookline, Mass., summer life in, 81. Brown, Annie, 227. Brown, Brownlee, 169. Brown, C. B., 58. Brown, John, 155, 196-234, 240, 242, 243, 246, 327. Brown, Mrs., John, 227, 230. Brown, Madox, 289. Brown, Theophilus, 181. Browning, Robert, 66, 67, 202, 235, 272, 286. Brownson, Orestes, 97. Bryce, James, 97. Bull, Ole, 103. Burke, Edmund, 009, 356. Burleigh, C. C., 327. Burleigh, Charles, 118. Burlingame, Anson, 175. Burney, Fanny, 15. Burns, Anthony, 131, 157, 159, 162, 165, 166. Burns, Robert, 276. Butler, B. F., 337, 342. Butman A. ., 162, 163, 164, L65. By
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 3: the Philadelphia period (search)
essional writer of any description, in Charles Brockden Brown, the novelist. The first national cbeing published in London in 1800, and Charles Brockden Brown, the so-called Father of American ficteph Smith entitled Eulogium on Rum. Charles Brockden Brown. After Philadelphia's prestige as a attention of trans-Atlantic readers. Charles Brockden Brown was born in Philadelphia, Jan. 17, 177 severer tasks of history -a memoir of Charles Brockden Brown by W. H. Prescott. It was an approprirganized with petty aims and smaller results. Brown's books, published between 1798 and 1801, madevely terse writer like Prescott, in composing Brown's biography only sixty years ago, shows tracesf their own faith. Prescott justly criticises Brown for saying, I was fraught with the apprehensiobefore 1801. It has been common to say that Brown had no literary skill, but it would be truer t came from any. It is easy enough to criticise Brown, but he unquestionably had his day and served [7 more...]
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