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appan! was shouted; but no one was molested, and the crowd dissolved in the comforting assurance that the Union was safe. But on the 4th of July, 1834, an attempt to hold an anti-Slavery celebration in Chatham-street Chapel was the signal for a furious and alarming riot. The prayer, the singing, and the reading of the Declaration, were endured with tolerable patience; but a Declaration of the Sentiments of the Anti-Slavery Society by Lewis Tappan was interrupted by hisses; and when David Paul Brown, of Philadelphia, commenced his oration, it was soon manifest that a large portion of the audience had come expressly not to hear him, nor let any one else. Rev. Samuel H. Cox interposed in behalf of Free Speech; but both were clamored down with cries of Treason! Treason! Hurrah for the Union! and the meeting quietly dispersed, without awaiting or provoking further violence. The leading commercial journals having commended this experiment in Union-saving, the actors were naturally
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), 48. impromptu reply to a lady who proposed to wear the patriotic Rosette of White, red, and Blue. (search)
48. impromptu reply to a lady who proposed to wear the patriotic Rosette of White, red, and Blue. by David Paul Brown. The flag you boast is Nature's gift, Forever fresh and new, You bear displayed upon your face, The Red, the White, and Blue. Your fair complexion is the White, Your eyes of azure hue; The rose that mantles on your cheek, Completes White, Red, and Blue. A patriot, thus by nature framed, Scorns artificial lures, And, nurtured by the smiles of Heav'n, Through time and change endures. But should your bright complexion fade, Your eyes forget to beam, And all the beauties of the rose Prove fleeting as a dream-- Still far beyond all outward show, That captivates the eye, Within your gentle bosom glow Virtues that never die. The patriot heart is ever there, Change colors as they will, In war or peace, hope or despair, True to your country still.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
e Rev. Amos A. Phelps and by Henry Benson, he visited southern New Hampshire and Portland, Maine, still enjoying the hospitality of the churches and promoting new antislavery organizations. Thence he proceeded in the same month to New York, where he spoke for the first time since his arrival in America, in the Rev. Dr. Lansing's church, without molestation or disorder of any kind; in March, to Philadelphia, giving an address in the Reformed Presbyterian Church, after an introduction by David Paul Brown. Repairing to Boston for lectures and debates in the Anti-Slavery Rooms, he returned to New York in company with Mr. Garrison. In April he was again in Boston, using the only church open to him (the Methodist Church in Bennett Street) for a Fast-Day and other discourses, and a third time in New York, forming en route a female anti-slavery society in the Providence Pine-Street Baptist Church; and then, once more with Messrs. Phelps and Benson for companions, he journeyed to Albany and
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
elf nobly. She spoke about ten minutes, and was succeeded by A. E. G. Weld, who occupied Ibid., p. 123. nearly an hour. As the tumult from without increased, and the brickbats fell thick and fast, (no one, however, being injured), her eloquence kindled, her eye flashed, and her cheeks glowed, as she devoutly thanked the Lord that the stupid repose of that city had at length been disturbed by the force of truth. Here may fitly be cited another passage from Mr. Garrison's censure of David Paul Brown on the previous morning (Tuesday, May 15): I know, indeed, that some will consider the remarks of that gentleman as adapted to please all parties—to allay, in some measure, the prejudice that prevails against us and our holy cause. These are your men of caution, and prudence, and judiciousness. Sir, I have learned to hate those words. Whenever we attempt to imitate our great Exemplar, and press the truth of God, in all its plainness, upon the conscience, why, we are very imprudent; b
pel, 356. Pringle, Thomas, 1.226. Providence (R. I.), colored petition for suffrage, 1.256.—See Rhode Island. Pugh, Sarah [b. Washington, D. C., 1800; d. Philadelphia, Aug. 1, 1884], 2.353. Puritan (Lynn), 2.424. Purvis, Robert [b. Charleston, S. C., Aug. 4, 1810], 1.342, 404; host of G., 283, aid in buying Thoughts on Colon., 312, has G. sit for portrait, 342, drives him to Trenton, 343; delegate to Nat. A. S. Convention, and late survivor, 397, 398, eulogy of G., 404; turns D. P. Brown from colonization, 413; aids G.'s escape from Philadelphia, 2.27.—Letters to G., 1.283; from G., 1.284, 311, 323, 314, G. Thompson, 1 433, 434—Portrait in Smedley's Underground R. R., p. 353. Putnam, George, 1.330. Quakers, A. S. Societies at South, 1.90, 95, 136; A. S. petition in Virginia, 251; English and American contrasted as abolitionists, 350; represented at Nat. A. S. Convention, 397; aversion to abolition, 479, 2.78; flattered by Van Buren, 82; declared pro-slavery by G., 33<
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
even hundred plays by American writers actually placed upon the boards. These figures are obviously incomplete, The histories of Dunlap, Durang, Wood, Ireland, Brown, Seilhammer, Clapp, Wemyss, and the Mss. diary of Wood have been carefully examined in preparation of these figures, but inaccuracies, confusions of titles of actehere is an additional historical interest. Among those dealing with ancient history the most significant are Payne's Brutus (1818), Bird's Gladiator (1831), David Paul Brown's Sertorius, the Roman Patriot, acted by the elder Booth in 1830, and Waldimar by John J. Bailey, produced by Charles Kean in 1831 and based on the massacre 2, and after long runs there and elsewhere was performed almost nightly in New York City from 18 July, 1853, to 19 April, 1854. Though it was not the first See Brown, T. A., History of the New York stage, 1903, vol. I, pp. 312-319, for an interesting account of the different dramatizations of Uncle Tom's Cabin. stage version i
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
H., 222 Brief account of the Agency of the Honorable John Winthrop, a, 152 Brief remarks on the defence of the Halifax libel, etc., 128 Brillon, Mme., 100 Bristed, John, 293 British prison ship, the, 182 British review, the, 206 British spy in Boston, the, 237 n. Broker of Bogota, 222,224 Brook Farm, 339-340, 345 Brooke, Henry, 165 Brother Jonathan, 309 Brothers, Thomas, 207 Brougham, John, 232 Brown, Charles Brockden, 287-292, 293, 295, 307, 308, 313 Brown, David Paul, 223 n., 224--John, 344 Brown, T. A., 227 n. Browne, Sir, Thomas, 104, 322 Browning, 261, 264, 266, 268, 274 Brownson, Orestes A., 333 Bruce, P. A., 216 n. Brutus, 220, 224 Bryant, Dr., Peter, 263 n. Bryant, W. C., 150, 163, 180, 183, 212, 240, 260-278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283 Buccaneer, the, 278 Buch, Leopold von, 187 Buckingham, J. S., 190 Buckingham, J. T., 236 n. Buckminster, Rev., Joseph Stevens, 330 Buffon, 91 Bulkeley, Peter, 349 Bunce,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
of fervor and feeling, imploring his blessing and sanctification upon the Convention and its labors. So ended the successful attempt to give a national basis to the movement begun only three years before by the publication of the Liberator. A public debate between R. S. Finley and Prof. Elizur Wright had taken place on the evenings of Dec. 5 and 6, and it was the design of the Colonizationists to follow the Convention closely with a great meeting of their own, but they broke down. David Paul Brown, Esq., was to have made a speech, but failed them, in consequence of a letter from Purvis (Ms. Dec. 12, 1833, Dr. Cox to W. L. G.). The significant articles of the Constitution of the American Anti-Slavery Society, adopted at Philadelphia, read as follows: Article II: The objects of this Society are the entire abolition of slavery Pamphlet, Proceedings Nat. A. S. Convention, pp. 6, 7. in the United States. While it admits that each State in which slavery exists has
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
seized by Gurley, the Rev. G. W. Bethune, a Methodist bishop from Virginia and others, for a colonizationist demonstration. Some of the ruffians bawled Lib. 4.79. out for Garrison, but he was out of their murderous reach. This was far from satisfying the Courier and Lib. 4.85. Enquirer, which warned the abolitionists never to meet again in New York. Disregarding this prohibition, the abolitionists of that city reassembled on the 4th of July at the Chapel, Lib. 4.110. with David Paul Brown, of Philadelphia, as the orator of the day. Hundreds of young men, who sat near Life of Arthur Tappan, p. 204. the doors, drowned his voice with derisive cheers and completely prevented a hearing. Their triumph was the beginning of an era of lawlessness which, fanned by the Courier and Enquirer, and first directed against the black population, was speedily turned against their friends. Lewis Tappan's house was gutted (July 9), Ibid., pp. 209-224; Lib. 4.111, 114; Niles' Register
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 5: the school of mobs (search)
owing the reason, while they themselves mounted guard all night. This was the ordeal by which Whittier's Quaker training was tested, but it rang true. He would not arm himself, but he did not flinch where others were arming. His courage was to be once more tested, however, in Philadelphia, while he edited the Pennsylvania Freeman. A hall had been erected by the antislavery people and other reformers, and was first opened on May 15, 1838. There was an address by the eminent lawyer, David Paul Brown, and a poem of a hundred and fifty lines by Whittier, whose publishing office was in the building. It was not one of his best poems, and he excluded it from his complete edition; but it was enough, with other things, to call out the gradually increasing wrath of a mob which hooted, yelled, and broke windows. On the third day the president of the Pennsylvania Hall Association called for the intervention of the mayor and sheriff. About sunset the mayor replied that, if the building we
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