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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 3: a cavalry officer of the army of the United States. (search)
own, and I have been received with every kindness. I presume we are fixed here until after the 16th. To-morrow will probably see the last of Captain Brown (Old John Brown). There will be less interest for the others, but still I think the troops will not be withdrawn till they are similarly disposed of. This morning I was introduced to Mrs. Brown, who with a Mr. Tyndale and Mrs. McKim, all from Philadelphia, has come on to have a last interview with her husband. As it is a matter over which I have no control, and wish to take none, I referred them to General William B. Taliaferro. Commanding the Virginia troops. Tell Smith [his brother in the navy] enterprise and indifferent to danger, he at once volunteered as aid-de-camp to Lee, asked and received permission to accompany him, and was the first to recognize Brown, having seen him in Kansas. Afterward he became the great cavalry chieftain of the Army Lee commanded. The prisoners at Harper's Ferry were at once turned over t
s and men under his command the thanks of the department for his recent brilliant success. General Prentiss and two thousand three hundred and eighty-six Union prisoners passed through Memphis, Tenn., this day. The men were in good spirits, and kindly treated by the inhabitants, particularly the Irish and German women. The citizens contented themselves with waving handkerchiefs and looking the interest which they dared not openly express. Gen. Prentiss made a Union speech to his men, and the citizens cheered him. The Provost-Marshal, L. D. McKissock, bade him remain silent. Prentiss told him he had four to one more friends in Memphis than he, (McKissock,) and said to the citizens: Keep quiet for a few weeks, and you will have an opportunity to cheer the old flag to your heart's content. The Union soldiers sang the Star-Spangled Banner, Red, White and Blue, Happy Land of Canaan, and Old John Brown, as they were starting on the cars for Tuscaloosa, Ala.--New York Tribune, May 2.
The Mobile Register gives the following novel treatment for curing chills: It is stated that a soldier of a Mississippi regiment, at Pensacola, went to his tent and blankets the other day to fight through an ague. A bottle of hot water to his feet not being convenient, some of his comrades went out and picked up one of the numerous shells Col. Brown had sent over during the bombardment, heated it at the fire, and put it to bed with the sick man's feet. Unhappily, the shell had lost its cap, but had not exploded. The heat of the camp-fire accomplished what Lincoln pyrotechny had failed in, to wit, an explosion. The tent was blown to pieces, and some of the men a little hurt and greatly astonished. We are happy to learn that no one was killed by the mishap.
ended money, furnished by the rebels, was found upon her person. She has been a correspondent of the Richmond Enquirer and the Baltimore Exchange. Miss Poole is yet in confinement in the Sixteenth-Street Jail. Among the number yet confined here is Mrs. Baxley, formerly a resident of Baltimore. She was arrested on the 23d of December. She had just come from Richmond, and had been in conversation with Jeff. Davis, from whom she had obtained a commission in the rebel army for her lover, Dr. Brown. She is, as she represents herself, a very explosive woman, and it was from this fact that her arrest took place on board the boat, while approaching Baltimore from Richmond. This woman has refused to sleep under a blanket marked U. S. ever since her confinement here. The above is a hurried sketch of the prisoners liberated and now confined in the Sixteenth-Street Jail. Their quarters are of the most comfortable character, and under the care of Lieutenant Sheldon, they are furnished
57. call all! call all! by Georgia. Whoop! the Doodles have broken loose, Roaring round like the very deuce! Lice of Egypt, a hungry pack, After 'em, boys, and drive 'em back. Bull-dog, terrier, cur and fice, Back to the beggarly land of ice; Worry 'em, bite 'em, scratch and tear Everybody and everywhere. Old Kentucky is caved from under, Tennessee is split asunder, Alabama awaits attack, And Georgia bristles up her back. Old John Brown is dead and gone! Still his spirit is marching on, Lantern-jawed, and legs, my boys, Long as an ape's from Illinois! Want a weapon? Gather a brick! Club or cudgel, or stone or stick, Anything with a blade or but, Anything that can cleave or cut. Anything heavy, or hard, or keen I Any sort of slaying machine! Anything with a willing mind, And the steady arm of a man behind. Want a weapon? Why, capture one! Every Doodle has got a gun, Belt and bayonet, bright and new, Kill a Doodle and capture two! Shoulder to shoulder, son and sire I All, call al
106. words that can be Sung to the Hallelujah Chorus. If people will sing about Old John Brown, there is no reason why they shouldn't have words with a little meaning and rhythm in them. Old John Brown lies a-mouldering in the grave, Old John Brown lies slumbering in his grave-- But John Brown's soul is marching with the braOld John Brown lies a-mouldering in the grave, Old John Brown lies slumbering in his grave-- But John Brown's soul is marching with the brave, His soul is marching on. Glory, glory, hallelujah! Glory, glory, hallelujah! Glory, glory, hallelujah! His soul is marching on. He has gone to be a soldier in the Army of the Lord, He is sworn as a private in the ranks of the Lord-- He shall stand at Armageddon with his brave old sword, When heaven is marching on. Glory, etc. Old John Brown lies slumbering in his grave-- But John Brown's soul is marching with the brave, His soul is marching on. Glory, glory, hallelujah! Glory, glory, hallelujah! Glory, glory, hallelujah! His soul is marching on. He has gone to be a soldier in the Army of the Lord, He is sworn as a private in the ranks of the Lord-- He shall stand at Armageddon with his brave old sword, When heaven is marching on. Glory, etc. For heaven is marching on. He shall file in front where the lines of battle form, He shall face to front when the squares of battle form-- Time with the column, and charge in the storm, Where men are marching on. Glory, etc. True men are marching on. Ah! foul tyrants! do ye hear him where he comes? Ah! black traitors! do ye kn
41. the Massachusetts John Brown song. by L. Holbrook. The day of vengeance is in mine heart, and the year of my redeemed is come.--Isaiah 63. Old John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the dust, Old John Brown's rifle's red with blood-stains turned to rust, Old John Brown's pike has made its last, unflinching thrust; His SOld John Brown's rifle's red with blood-stains turned to rust, Old John Brown's pike has made its last, unflinching thrust; His Soul is marching on. The car of fire descrying beyond the prison-gloom, Of all that crowd the calmest, he marched to meet his doom; The Church, the Bride, no gladder shall go to meet the Groom. His Soul is marching on. For treason hung because he struck at treason's root, When soon Palmetto-tree had ripened treason's fruit, His dus” His Soul is marching on. The pitcher now of compromise away is thrown, The lamp of faith flames out, and by its light is drawn The sword of the Lord, and of Old John Brown. His Soul is marching on. Then strike! Jehovah shall His sword with victory crown. For God and Country strike the fiend rebellion down I For Freedom and the
rs in the prologue to the tragic national drama, the different acts of which the whole country has been watching with such exciting interest for the past three years. It is, nevertheless, the fact, however. Let me tell you about it briefly. Old John Brown had not only worked at the arsenal at Harper's Ferry, but was intimately acquainted with all the details of the works, and knew, besides, what building among the ruins of some fifty now remaining was the strongest for defence. This was the eeholders of the Shenandoah Valley, he moved back to the Ferry, and ensconced himself with his twenty followers in this engine-house. The alarm throughout Harper's Ferry that night was terrible, and during the whole of the following live-long day Brown held his position, and having made portholes through the brick walls, shot several citizens who had the temerity to show themselves about the building. The lookers — on were terror-stricken, and the two thousand Virginia militiamen, with their c
But now, to the long, long night They pass, as they ne'er had been-- A stranger and sadder sight Than ever the sun hath seen. For his waning beams illume A vast and a sullen train Going down to the gloom-- One wretched and drear refrain The only line on their tomb-- “They died-and they died in vain!” Gone — ah me!--to the grave, And never one note of song! The Muse would weep for the brave, But how shall she chant the wrong? For a wayward wench is she-- One that rather would wait With Old John Brown at the tree Than Stonewall dying in state. When, for the wrongs that were, Hath she lilted a single stave? Know, proud hearts, that, with her, 'Tis not enough to be brave By the injured, with loving glance, Aye hath she lingered of old, And eyed the evil askance, Be it never so haughty and bold. With Homer, alms gift in hand, With Dante, exile and free, With Milton, blind in the Strand, With Hugo, lone by the sea! In the attic, with Beranger, She could carol, how blithe and free! Of the <
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: Pottawattomie. (search)
briefly told. In all that region, ever since the opening of the Territory for settlement, the pro-slavery party had been brutally tyrannical. Free State men were daily robbed, beaten, and killed; their property was stolen, openly, before their eyes; and yet they did not dare to resist the outrages. One or two families alone were occasionally exempted, by their character for desperate courage, from these daring and unwarrantable assaults. Among them were the sons and son-in-law of Old John Brown; and even they had repeatedly suffered from the conduct of the ruffians, until the arrival of their father in the autumn, with arms. Then, until the months of April and May, a season of peace was allowed them. But when, in fulfilment of the plan of the Missouri secret lodges, the Territory was to be conquered for slavery, it at once became a question of life, death, or immediate banishment to the settlers in Southern Kansas how they should act against the invading pro-slavery party and
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