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on Washington's estate, were shot dead; and Oliver Brown, another of the old man's sons, being hit bent of the same force assailed them in front. Brown, seeing that his assailants were in overwhelmihad already been liberated upon the retreat of Brown to the engine-house. Col. Baylor commanded in chief. The firing ceased at nightfall. Brown offered to liberate his prisoners, upon condition tdge in safety, which was refused. Night found Brown's forces reduced to three unwounded whites besrty, who had been sent out at early morning by Brown to capture slaveholders, and liberate slaves, mory guard, very close to the engine-house. Brown, of course, remained awake and alert through tmond soon after: Col. Washington said that Brown was the coolest man he ever saw in defying deareat; in an instant, all resistance was over. Brown was struck in the face with a saber and knockegham, of Ohio, hastened to visit and catechise Brown, in the hope of making political capital out o[2 more...]
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
while bearing a flag of truce; died October 19, 1859. Salmon Brown, October 2, 1836, Hudson, Ohio; married Abbie C. Hinckley, October 15, 1856; lives at North Elba. Charles Brown, November 3, 1837, Hudson, Ohio; died September 11, 1843. Oliver Brown, March 9, 1839, Franklin, Ohio; married Martha E. Brewster, April 17, 1858; killed at Harper's Ferry, October 17, 1859. Peter Brown, December 7, 1840, Hudson, Ohio; died September 22, 1843. Austin Brown, September 14, 1842, Richfield, Ohioey could not, they told their mother and their wives, live for themselves alone; and so they went. One young wife, less submissive than the others, prevailed on her husband to remain; and this is the only reason why Salmon Brown survives. Oliver Brown, the youngest son, only twenty, wrote back to his wife from Harper's Ferry in a sort of premonition of what was coming, , If I can do a single good action, my life will not have been all a failure. The family of John Brown. Having had th
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: the man. (search)
d thirteen children: Sarah Brown, born May 11, 1834, at Richmond, Pennsylvania; died, September 23, 1843. Watson Brown, October 7, 1835, Franklin, Ohio; married Isabella M. Thompson, September, 1856;--wounded at Harper's Ferry, October 17, while bearing a flag of truce; died October 19, 1859. Salmon Brown, October 2, 1836, Hudson, Ohio; married Abbie C. Hinckley, October 15, 1856; lives at North Elba. Charles Brown, November 3, 1837, Hudson, Ohio; died September 11, 1843. Oliver Brown, March 9, 1839, Franklin, Ohio; married Martha E. Brewster, April 17, 1858; killed at Harper's Ferry, October 17, 1859. Peter Brown, December 7, 1840, Hudson, Ohio; died September 22, 1843. Austin Brown, September 14, 1842, Richfield, Ohio; died September 27, 1843. Anne Brown, December 23, 1843, Richfield, Ohio. Amelia Brown, June 22, 1845, Akron, Ohio; died October 30, 1846. Sarah Brown, (2d,) September 11, 1846, Akron, Ohio. Ellen Brown, (1st,) May 20, 1848, Springfield, Mas
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
so lived in the same vicinity, and one of them also has left a widow. Thus complicated and intertangled is this genealogy of sorrow. All these young men went deliberately from North Elba for no other purpose than to join in this enterprise. They could not, they told their mother and their wives, live for themselves alone; and so they went. One young wife, less submissive than the others, prevailed on her husband to remain; and this is the only reason why Salmon Brown survives. Oliver Brown, the youngest son, only twenty, wrote back to his wife from Harper's Ferry in a sort of premonition of what was coming, , If I can do a single good action, my life will not have been all a failure. The family of John Brown. Having had the honor of Captain Brown's acquaintance for some years, I was admitted into the confidence of the family, though I could see them observing me somewhat suspiciously as I approached the door. Every thing that was said of the absent father and husband
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: sword in hand. (search)
xchanging volleys. In the course of this fight, Oliver Brown was shot, retreated inside of the gate, spoke noNewby. In the engine house were the remains of Oliver Brown, and Dauphin Thompson; while Watson, the Captainivors of the Liberators in the engine house were Captain Brown, Jerry Anderson, Edwin Coppoc, and Shields Greenrm, as I was chilled through. After I got warm, Captain Brown ordered me to go with C. P. Tidd, who was to takand the slaves who accompanied him were to go to Captain Brown's house, and to load in the arms and bring them l house. When we got there, I was to remain, by Captain Brown's orders, with one of the slaves to guard the ard Burns was to be sent with William H. Leeman to Captain Brown at the Armory. It was at this time that William and some eatables. I was informed by them that Captain Brown was dead; that he had been shot about four o'clofind no one. I then started up the road towards Captain Brown's house; I saw a party of men coming down the ro
oseph Bates, Sergt., Samll. Butterfield. Sergt., James Kittle, Sergt., Thos. Fillebrown, Corp., Belcher Hancock. Corp., Joshua Gamage, Drumr., Will. Bradish, Drumr., Joseph Ayers, John Batherick, Will. Bordman, Jr., Oliver Brown, Benj. Butterfield, Edmund Bowman, Will. Brewer, John Caldwell, Walter Coxs, Cox is the proper name. Samll. Coxs, Joseph Coxs, Solomon Cooper, Henry Dickson, Isaiah Dickson, John Dickson, John Evers, Ebtains, Benjamin Locke, John Walton; Lieutenants, Solomon Bowman, Samuel Butterfield, William Colson, Stephen Frost, Samuel Locke, Josiah Moore, Josiah Warren, Jotham Walton, John Wyman; Sergeants, Joseph Bates, Joseph Belknap, Nathaniel Bemis, Oliver Brown, John Burns, John Cutter, Josiah Dana, James Fillebrown, Thomas Fillebrown, Belcher Hancock, William Harrington, Moses Hovey, James Kettle, Isaac Learned, Joseph Trask, Isaac Tufts, Elkanah Welch, Jeduthun Wellington; Corporals, Michael Appleb
riately provided by both, how doubly sustained is he in camp or battle field!--Amidst the almost universal kindness extended to the soldier by the citizens of Winchester, and, indeed, by Virginians everywhere, individual instances may be considered Ill-timed and unnecessary; but I must crave indulgence for the expression of a Georgia soldier's gratitude to the families of two of your own noble citizens for the special kindness of which he has been the recipient. To the lady and family of Oliver Brown, Esq., so cheerfully seconded by himself, he is specially indebted for those unremitting attentions and delicate favors so cheering and grateful to the sick soldier; and, as the best return which he can now make, and perhaps the most acceptable, he would invoke Heaven's richest blessings upon them and their's, with the assurance that, should life be spared him to reach once more his Georgia home, he will carry with him a lively remembrance of it all, refreshened and sweetened by the recol