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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 18 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 6 0 Browse Search
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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Publishers' Card. (search)
desire of the friends who contribute it that it should appear exclusively in this volume, for the benefit of the family. The work is published with the sanction and approval of the family of Captain Brown, as may be seen by the following letters: North Elba, Dec., 1859. Messrs. Thayer & Eldridge. Dear Friends: I am satisfied that Mr. Redpath is the man to write the life of my beloved husband, as he was personally acquainted with him, and I think will do him justice. ... I think that the portrait is a very good one. Yours respectfully, Mary A. Brown. North Elba, Dec., 1859. Messrs. Thayer and Eldridge. Dear Sirs: I was somewhat acquainted with James Redpath in Kansas. I am also familiar with his writings, and I consider him an able biographer, and the man above all others to write the life of my beloved father. I believe him to be a man of undoubted veracity, and fully believe he will do justice to the work he has undertaken. Yours respectfully, Salmon Brown.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
h day of July, 1798. John Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in Torrington, the 9th day of May, 1800. Salmon Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born on the 30th day of April, 1802. Oliver Owen Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Browpson, September, 1856;--wounded at Harper's Ferry, October 17, while bearing a flag of truce; died October 19, 1859. Salmon Brown, October 2, 1836, Hudson, Ohio; married Abbie C. Hinckley, October 15, 1856; lives at North Elba. Charles Brown, Nov One young wife, less submissive than the others, prevailed on her husband to remain; and this is the only reason why Salmon Brown survives. Oliver Brown, the youngest son, only twenty, wrote back to his wife from Harper's Ferry in a sort of premonhen know that his own home was among the Adirondacks. Just before we went, I remember, I said something or ether to Salmon Brown about the sacrifices of their family; and he looked up in a quiet, manly way, which I shall never forget, and said bri
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: the child and his ancestors. (search)
aughters, of whom Ruth, the eldest child, married Owen Brown, the father of our hero. John Brown born. The town records of Torrington supply these dates: Owen Brown, now of Torrington, late of Simsbury, was married at Simsbury, on the 11th day of February, A. D. 1793. Anna Ruth Brown, daughter of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in the town of Norfolk, the 5th day of July, 1798. John Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in Torrington, the 9th day of May, 1800. Salmon Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born on the 30th day of April, 1802. Oliver Owen Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born the 26th day of October, A. D. 1804. John Brown, therefore, was born in the year 1800, at Torrington, Connecticut, where he lived, about a mile north-west of the meeting house, until the age of five, when his father emigrated to Hudson, Ohio; where, we are told, he became one of the principal pioneer settlers of that then new town, ever respected for his pr
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: the man. (search)
his mother three days after his birth. By his second wife, Mary A. Day, to whom he was married at Meadville, Pennsylvania, (while he was living at Richmond, in Crawford County,) he had thirteen children: Sarah Brown, born May 11, 1834, at Richmond, Pennsylvania; died, September 23, 1843. Watson Brown, October 7, 1835, Franklin, Ohio; married Isabella M. Thompson, September, 1856;--wounded at Harper's Ferry, October 17, while bearing a flag of truce; died October 19, 1859. Salmon Brown, October 2, 1836, Hudson, Ohio; married Abbie C. Hinckley, October 15, 1856; lives at North Elba. Charles Brown, November 3, 1837, Hudson, Ohio; died September 11, 1843. Oliver Brown, March 9, 1839, Franklin, Ohio; married Martha E. Brewster, April 17, 1858; killed at Harper's Ferry, October 17, 1859. Peter Brown, December 7, 1840, Hudson, Ohio; died September 22, 1843. Austin Brown, September 14, 1842, Richfield, Ohio; died September 27, 1843. Anne Brown, December 23, 1843, Ric
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
in this enterprise. They could not, they told their mother and their wives, live for themselves alone; and so they went. One young wife, less submissive than the others, prevailed on her husband to remain; and this is the only reason why Salmon Brown survives. Oliver Brown, the youngest son, only twenty, wrote back to his wife from Harper's Ferry in a sort of premonition of what was coming, , If I can do a single good action, my life will not have been all a failure. The family of Johnhe Alleghany Mountains from the foundation of the world that they might one day be a refuge for fugitive slaves. I did not then know that his own home was among the Adirondacks. Just before we went, I remember, I said something or ether to Salmon Brown about the sacrifices of their family; and he looked up in a quiet, manly way, which I shall never forget, and said briefly, I sometimes think that is what we came into the world for — to make sacrifices. And I know that the murmuring echo of
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XI: John Brown and the call to arms (search)
ay, How much sunshine you brought into our desolate homes is left only for us to tell. In his own account of the visit, Mr. Higginson records that he spoke to Salmon Brown about the sacrifices of their family. He looked up in a quiet, manly way, which I shall never forget, and said briefly, I sometimes think that is what we camethy the society I had been permitted to enter who did not come forth from it a wiser and a better man. The next scheme to enlist Mr. Higginson's interest, after Brown's sentence had been pronounced, was a plan of revenge formed by a Boston abolitionist, Lysander Spooner, to kidnap the governor of Virginia and keep him as hostage for the safety of Brown. A scrap of paper exists on which Mr. Higginson had written, November 14, 1859, Would it not be practicable for a party of men to go in a steamboat to kidnap in the night——and hold him as a hostage for the safety of——. Spooner wrote Higginson, November 20, that the men, a pilot, and a boat could be furn