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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 8 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. 2 0 Browse Search
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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
in 1860, $107,505; in 1865, $133,234. The selectmen in 1861 were Dennis Thayer, James Mixer, Hiram Brown; in 1862, Waterman Brown, John Page, Joseph Miner; in 1863, Waterman Brown, Joseph Miner, Hiram Brown; in 1864, Joseph D. Clark, Ezra W. GleasWaterman Brown, Joseph Miner, Hiram Brown; in 1864, Joseph D. Clark, Ezra W. Gleason, Joseph Miner, Jr.; in 1865, Richard Shattuck, Laban Clark, Henry Worthy. The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Waterman Brown; in 1864, William W. Gallup; in 1865, Charles W. Briggs. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Joseph Clark; in 1862 Waterman Brown; in 1864, William W. Gallup; in 1865, Charles W. Briggs. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Joseph Clark; in 1862 and 1863, Joseph B. Wheeler; in 1864, Waterman Brown; in 1865, Eleazer Ketchum. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year. 1862. The first meeting to act upon war Waterman Brown; in 1865, Eleazer Ketchum. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year. 1862. The first meeting to act upon war matters was held on the 22d of July; at which five hundred dollars were appropriated to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of five men who would enlist in the military service for three years, to fill the quota of the town. August 18th, Vot
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 12., A pioneer railroad and how it was built. (search)
was the snake's head, or end of a loosened rail punching through the floor of the car, to the passengers' discomfort not to say danger of impalement. The stone ties were about eight feet long and a foot wide; generally nine or ten inches in thickness, and were roughly split and slightly dressed, to receive the base of the iron chairs. One of these may be seen in Wood-brook Cemetery in Woburn, with a section of one of the original rails and chair bolted upon it. It marks the grave of Waterman Brown, who was employed in the construction of the railway, was later an employee of the company and lost an arm in its service, and ever afterward was continued in its employ. Being a man of natural gifts and a close observer of mechanical matters, he constructed a set of models of the first engines, cars (both passenger and freight), a pile driver with its tread mill for hoisting the hammer, and other railroad appliances, which is a most instructive exhibit of the early days of railroad ent
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30., The Brooks Estates in Medford from 1660 to 1927. (search)
usly and premiums also [he was in the insurance business at a time when all underwriting was done by individuals at private offices, of which there were but three in Boston], owing to the captures and restraints of the powers of war, so that from June, 1793, to the peace of Amiens, I was more busily employed and perhaps more profitably than any young man of my acquaintance. . . . The funding system and the First National Bank were great objects of speculation in 1791, and about that period Mr. Brown [a trusted adviser] took no part in them himself, but urged me to, and I did to great advantage, for though I had little property then, he kindly offered to stand in as my surety to any amount. Now it was, what with my office and the funds, that I made money hand over hand. In June, 1803, I quitted the business of a private insurance office. . . . In 1806 I became the president of the New England Insurance Company and so remained about ten years, since which I have been my own man. . . .
used on the Boston and Lowell, which made its initial journey to Boston on June 24, 1835. Our frontispiece presents the models of the engine imported from England, a passenger car, a burthen car, construction and hand-car, also a snow-plow. Waterman Brown of Woburn, an earlier employee on the road, made this most instructive exhibit, which is now in possession of the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston. Mr. Brown lost an arm by accident on the road at West Medford, and was ever after kMr. Brown lost an arm by accident on the road at West Medford, and was ever after kept in the company's service. He was fireman on one of the early locomotives, which was trying to beat an earlier record of nearly a mile a minute, when it overtook a stalled freight train in the cut above Grove street. To see the steel monsters of today, go up to the High and Canal street grade crossings,—stop, look, listen, when the Canadian Pacific and Pullmans speed by. Stand safely away, and remember that when the road was chartered it was expected that people might operate their own
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30., A New ship, a New colony, and a New church. (search)
owship of other churches. An Ecclesiastical Council having been held at a previous hour consisting of Rev. Dr. Jenks [moderator], Rev. Sereno E. Dwight and Bro. Samuel Train, Samuel Train, in 1827, moved to Medford and here became a well-known citizen, living in the second house west from the First Parish or Unitarian church. See Register. Vol. II, p. 67; Vol. XVIII, p. 89. Park Street, Rev. Ebenezer Rogers and Dea. Samuel Fales, First Church, Dedham, Rev. Justin Edwards and Dea. Mark Brown, South Church, Andover, Rev. Benjamin B. Wisner and Dea. William Phillips, Old South Church, Rev. Samuel Green and Bro. John Tappan, Union Church, who after hearing and approving the articles of faith and covenant which had been adopted by the persons desirous of being embodied in the church, proceeded to organize such of them as were presented with certificates of dismission and recommendation, into a distinct body. Their names are as follows: John Selmar Nubia Newport Gardner Rob