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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 2 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Clarence S. Brown or search for Clarence S. Brown in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

ject they be considered as part of my own. I claim credit for the officers of my staff, and for those acting as such during the day. They did every thing in their power, exposing themselves freely when required, and doing all that men could do; communicating orders, guiding the columns, exhorting the troops, rallying them when broken, and providing for them the best the circumstances permitted. They are as follows: First Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, Fifth Artillery, aide-de-camp. Major Clarence S. Brown, New York Militia Volunteers, aide-de-camp. Major James S. Wadsworth, New York Militia Volunteers, aide-de-camp; the latter, who does me the honor to be on my personal staff, had a horse shot under him in the hottest of the fight. Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Captain O. H. Tillinghast, Assistant Quartermaster, who discharged alone the important and burdensome duties of his department with the army, and who was mortally wounded while acting with the artillery, t
ad been removed on the opposite side, and the mule on which the guide was mounted had fallen through, and he barely escaped sharing its destruction by clinging to the timbers. The rebels, encouraged by our delay at the fearful impediment, broke into wild shouts and cheers. Fired by their assurances of victory, our boys could be restrained no longer; they answered with terrific yells, some ran to the pathholes of the bridge and discharged their muskets at the foe, and Company A, led by Capt. Brown, made a dash in single file across the bare stringers and rafters of the bridge, followed by Company D (Woodward Guards) and the remaining companies. As they emerged from the bridge the rebels flanked and charged front from the mouth of the bridge to the road which encircled the base of the hill, and sent another bitter volley at our men, which luckily was aimed too high, and did but little damage. Our men at this time had all cleared the bridge in total disorder, but blazing away wit
my under Brigadier-General McDowell, now advancing into Virginia from the lines opposite Washington. General orders no. 13. Headquarters, Department N. E. Virginia, Washington, July 8, 1861. Until otherwise ordered, the following will be the organization of the troops in this Department: staff of the Department Commander. Adjutant--General's Department.--Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Aides-de-Camp.--First-Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, 5th Artillery; Major Clarence S. Brown, N. Y. State Militia; Major James S. Wordsworth, N. Y. State Militia. Acting Inspector-General.--Major W. H. Wood, 17th Infantry. Engineers.--Major J. G. Barnard; First-Lieutenant F. E. Prime. Topographical Engineers.--Captain A. W. Whipple; First-Lieutenant Henry L. Abbott; Second-Lieutenant Haldimand S. Putnam. Quartermaster's Department.--Captain O. H. Tillinghast, Assistant Quartermaster. Subsistence Department.--Capt. H. F. Clarke, Commissary of Subsistence. Medical Dep
trees the bright bayonets of our long line of troops,--while the artillery was just crossing the road by which we were approaching. We pushed our carriage into the front, and very soon overtook Gen. McDowell and his staff, Major Wadsworth and Major Brown, accompanied by Capt. Whipple of the Topographical Engineers. We learned that this was one of four columns on their march under orders to converge at Fairfax Court House. It consisted of about 6,000 men, and was led by the Second Rhode Islanheir battery in the van. They sleep and bivouac in the yards of the houses. The handsome figure and face of Col. Burnside can be seen everywhere. Col. Hunter, with his quiet, gentlemanly manner, is directing the lines, and Gen. McDowell, with Maj. Brown and Maj. Wadsworth, are sitting their horses, and watching with their glasses the very dark lines on the hills about a mile to the south, which show that Gen. Tyler is approaching. Now the Rhode Island First goes by, and the New Hampshire Seco
Doc. 164.-skirmish near point of Rocks, Md. Berlin, Md., August 6, 1861. Messrs. Editors: You will please announce in your morning paper that a sharp skirmish took place this morning opposite the Point of Rocks, in Virginia. A detachment of sixty men of the Twenty-eighth regiment of New York Volunteers, stationed at our place, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, crossed the river at this place last night and marched through the county, and came on a party of cavalry of Captain Mead's company, of the Confederate army, opposite the Point of Rocks. The Colonel, with his party, came on them about sunrise, and ordered them to halt, which was not obeyed, and they fired on them and killed three, wounded two, and took twenty horses, with their equipments, and seven prisoners. They brought them into camp this morning about ten o'clock, without getting a man hurt. Among the killed is George Orrison, of Loudon County. Among the prisoners are a son of Mrs. Dawson, one M
his gunners failed to hit either the sand bags or the men around and near them. He doubtless then bethought him that, as he had succeeded so well in opening ladies' letters, he would be as triumphant in frightening or injuring some of our women and children. May his name be infamous for the dastardly deed. Several large shells exploded high in the air, the pieces flying in all directions, far and near. One piece traversed the roof of Mr. Tankersley's house, one square in the rear of Mr. Brown's and Gen. Nichols' residence, on Broadway. It went through the pantry, next to the kitchen, and through the outer plank wall into the yard. We heard of a piece falling at the south side of the public square, penetrating the roof and floor of Mr. J. Dykeman's portico; and an entire bomb at Mr. Blose's foundry, and a piece going to the first ward market, and one shell burying itself near Smyth's garden; but none, fortunately, hitting any one, though some narrow escapes were had. We were s