Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for George William Brown or search for George William Brown in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
was to defend the national capital. The mayor of Baltimore, George William Brown, also issued his proclamation, expressing his satisfaction tdicated, and a revolutionary government of action instituted. Mayor Brown was a high-minded, just and honorable gentleman. But he was a l State and to his city, and no purer patriot ever lived than George William Brown. But he believed in law; he could conceive of nothing highefiles had to force their way through this pack of humanity. George William Brown, mayor of the town, with a gallantry and chivalry beyond imawd. No man in Baltimore was more loved, respected and admired than Brown, and his escort of the invader was submitted to while he was presenundel rode straight to the city hall and presented themselves to Mayor Brown to assist in the defense of the city. The afternoon papers of tmed to take it for granted that the Potomac would be blockaded. Mayor Brown returned from Washington with the assurance that the detachment
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: Marylanders in the campaigns of 1861. (search)
oln, but they are not worth the room it would take to record them. The time for protests was past, if it ever had existed, and as the scolding of the Maryland legislature became annoying to the authorities, they determined to suppress the one and thus silence the other. On September 12, 1861, Major-General Dix, commanding in Baltimore, ordered the arrest of the members of the legislature from Baltimore City and the mayor and other obnoxious persons who annoyed him with talk, to-wit: George William Brown, Coleman Yellott, Senator Stephen P. Dennis, Charles H. Pitts, Andrew A. Lynch, Lawrence Langston, H M. Morfit, Ross Winans, J. Hanson Thomas, W. G. Harrison, John C. Brune, Robert M. Denison, Leonard D. Quinlan, Thomas W. Renshaw, Henry May, member of Congress from the Fourth congressional district, Frank Key Howard, editor of the Baltimore Exchange, and Thomas W. Hall, editor of the South. The arrests were made with great secrecy, and it was intended to send them to the Dry Tortug