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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 4 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 17, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Isaac N. Brown or search for Isaac N. Brown in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
nd was only able to drift down at the lowest speed and with the current she got down to the forts at Vicksburg before any of us had steam up. The Arkansas was undoubtedly much damaged by the fire of the fleet; her smokestack was riddled, and although she was built to be invulnerable, several eleven-inch shots penetrated her, cutting her up inside and killing and wounding twenty of her crew. Among the killed was the first pilot, and among the wounded were the commanding officer, Lieutenant Isaac N. Brown, and another pilot. The vessels of the fleet suffered from the Arkansas as she passed down, each of the wooden ships receiving one or two shots. Commander William D. Porter, of the gunboat Essex, volunteered to go down with his vessel and destroy the ram, but his gallant attempt was unsuccessful, and the Essex was much cut up by the batteries. The morning after this affair, Farragut got under way with his ships and proceeded down the river to protect the mortars and transpor
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
y guns mounted in the enemy's works and one vessel was captured which had formerly been a gun-boat. Unfortunately, while the De Kalb was moving slowly along and firing on the enemy she ran foul of a floating torpedo, which exploded, and the vessel sank almost immediately, a second torpedo exploding under her stern as she went down. The squadron had pushed ahead with too much enthusiasm to bring the enemy to close quarters where grape-shot and canister would tell. It seems that Lieutenant Isaac N. Brown, of the Confederate Navy, had on a former occasion been prevented by the citizens from placing torpedoes in front of Yazoo City, and it was supposed that it would not be permitted on this occasion for fear of the consequences in the destruction of the property of the inhabitants, should the Union forces get possession of Yazoo City. Lieutenant-Commander Walkertherefore felt confident that he could proceed without encountering any of these destructive machines. The loss of the De