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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 4 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 17, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Isaac N. Brown or search for Isaac N. Brown in all documents.

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of completing the boat was put in charge of Lieut. Isaac N. Brown, C. S. N., who had entered the United Statesumstances, inspired by the indomitable energy of Captain Brown. The planters furnished laborers; forges were sfrom the old United States navy. On July 12th,Captain Brown dropped down to Satartia bar, and after a day spwing up, came within gunshot and a minie ball struck Brown in the temple and momentarily rendered him unconscioct with the great Federal fleet which now lay before Brown and his men like a forest of masts and smokestacks. nt. Undauntedly they advanced to the attack of what Brown described as appearing like a whole navy, four or fie guns. Another ram was across our way ahead, says Brown in an account of this wonderful fight. As I gave thder the fire of the lower fleet. This movement of Brown's compelled part of the fleet above the city to drop This fourth and final battle left the Arkansas, as Brown is fully justified in saying, though reduced in crew
the Thirty-seventh Alabama. When they reached the field, Colonel Martin led the first and last regiments in support of Hebert's left, while General Little in person conducted the Thirtysev-enth and Thirty-eighth on the right. Martin pressed forward gallantly, pushing the enemy before him, and after the firing ceased made a charge with his two regiments, capturing several prisoners. In his report, Martin particularly noticed the bravery of Colonel Witherspoon of the Thirty-sixth, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, and Major Slaton. The men conducted themselves with the coolness and valor of veterans, though for the first time under fire. The Thirty-seventh, Col. Robert Mc-Lain, and Thirty-eighth, Col. F. W. Adams, were ordered to the front and under heavy fire, but on account of Little's death did not take an active part in the battle. The regimental loss in killed and wounded was, Thirty-sixth, 22; Thirty-seventh, 32; Thirty-eighth, 8; Fortieth, 49. Previous to the battle of Iuka the Mis
ness to withdraw Cockrell if so ordered. The withdrawal was peremptorily ordered and executed on April 17th. At the same time the Sixth Mississippi, First Confederate battalion, and one field battery, were sent from Jackson to reinforce Grand Gulf, and Green's brigade from Vicksburg. During this period considerable excitement was caused by the raft obstruction of the Yazoo at Snyder's Mill giving way and opening the channel. Further up the river, near Greenwood, the indefatigable Capt. I. N. Brown had been constructing a little fleet of cotton clad gunboats, to aid in the defense of the Yazoo line. The raft was soon replaced, and gradually fear of a Federal attack in that quarter was allayed. On the night of April 22d, six more gunboats and a lot of barges ran past Vicksburg to New Carthage. While these ominous preparations were being made, Confederate forces in the interior of the State were held back from the threatened points by General Grierson's raid from La Grange, Te
sending an expedition against Canton, the troops started back to Vicksburg. On the 21st Sherman sent word to Grant that he had promised 200 barrels of flour and 20,000 pounds of pork, or equivalents, to the inhabitants, as there were about 800 women and children who would perish unless they received some relief. Grant promptly honored the requisition. On July 13th a Federal expedition under General Herron arrived at Yazoo City in transports, accompanied by a gunboat flotilla. Commander Isaac N. Brown was there, with the few boats that he had improvised, and a small garrison in the fortifications. He repulsed the gunboats at first, and blew up the Federal ironclad De Kalb, with thirteen guns, by a torpedo explosion, but was forced to burn his own flotilla and evacuate the position. At Natchez on the same day, Brigadier-General Ransom landed and occupied the town, whence he made expeditions to destroy military property at Liberty, and a cotton factory and railroad transportation