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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 1,857 43 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 250 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 242 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 138 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 129 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 126 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 116 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 6 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 89 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for John Brown or search for John Brown in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 11 document sections:

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The siege of Morris Island. (search)
that Sumter could not be breached until after Wagner had been reduced; but Gillmore thought differently, and bent all his energies to make good the faith that was in him. The engineers commenced work on the night of the 25th of July, and by the 16th of August the batteries were completed. They were eight in number — the nearest one being thirty-four hundred yards from Sumter, and the farthest forty-two hundred and thirty-five yards. Seven of these batteries bore the distinctive names of Brown, Rosecrans, Meade, Hayes, Reno, Stevens, and Strong, mounting the following guns, viz.: one three-hundred-pounder, six two-hundred-pounders, nine one-hundred-pounders, two eighty-four-pounder Whitworth, two thirty and four twenty-pounders; all Parrotts except two guns, and the whole of them rifled. Never before had such a weight of metal been directed against any fortress in one attack since the art of war began. Those who have not engaged in such operations can have only a faint idea of t
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Fire, sword, and the halter. (search)
of high temper, morose and fretful to such a degree that he was known by the soubriquet of Grumble Jones. He held the fighting qualities of the enemy in great contempt, and never would admit the possibility of defeat where the odds against him were not much over two to one. So that when he took command of our little army, consisting of only a part of my brigade, not over one thousand men; Vaughan's Brigade, six hundred to eight hundred men; the two temporary conglomerate brigades under Colonels Brown and Jones, of about one thousand men each, and about seven hundred reserves, a total of between four thousand and four thousand five hundred men, including the two batteries, he was entirely confident that he could whip Hunter. We fully expected an attack early on the morning of the 4th. The enemy not appearing, however, up to ten o'clock, I sent a regiment of cavalry — the Eighteenth Virginia, under Colonel George W. Imboden--to Hunter's side of the river to find out what he was doing
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union men of Maryland. (search)
less spirits at hand-few it may be; but enough to make the onslaught, and there was an abundance of fuel when once the flame was kindled. When the troops came it seemed to be a surprise to all, police as well as citizens; but a mob soon collected and began to hoot and jeer, and finally to throw stones and bricks. Some Union men came forward and endeavored to restrain the crowd and to protect the troops, but they were overborne, and the mob worked its will with the results above given. Mayor Brown, in a letter, dated April 20th, replying to Governor Andrews, who had requested him to have the Massachusetts dead taken care of and forwarded to Boston, says: No one deplores the sad events of yesterday in this city more deeply than myself; but they were inevitable. Our people viewed the passage of armed troops to another State through the streets as an invasion of our soil, and could not be restrained. On the day of the riot, I dined at Barnum's Hotel, where I had been stopping sinc
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The old Capitol prison. (search)
ently did not admire. However, nolens volens, Brown was and must be his room-mate, as the crowded ys he manifested a friendly disposition toward Brown until he succeeded in winning his confidence. after a visit to the prison yard, he informed Brown that he had overheard the colonel commanding the prisons giving orders preparatory to his (Brown's) execution by shooting, to take place the nextng. Believing this absurd tale, the effect on Brown was terrible, and so thoroughly was he frightehe impending doom. Escape! it was heaven, and Brown listened with an eager ear to anything that prg it, and he was free. And the half-crazed Brown agreed. Taking up one of the floor-planks, abr midnight rounds. Bidding his mate good-bye, Brown slowly emerged from the window on his hands and frightened, fled the length of the yard, and Brown, unhurt, sprang to his feet and dashed in headrolina, Governor Letcher, of Virginia, and Governor Brown, of Georgia, were, for a few months, recip[2 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Confederate negro enlistments. (search)
laugh and song, and they kept step instinctively as they sang their own versions of Dixie and John Brown's body, rapping, castanet-wise, upon the pavements with the wooden soles of their huge and shaand obstreperous Congressmen like him, and the pure obstructionists, like Henry S. Foote and Governor Brown, of Georgia, and, in a lesser degree, Alexander H. Stephens, began to murmur and denounce. nd demoralizing, and would divide the Confederacy. On the other hand, Conrad, of Louisiana, and Brown, of Mississippi, both introduced propositions which recited the contrary. In fact, as has been ecret session of both houses on the 4th, 6th, 7th, and 8th. On the 9th, the Senate rejected Senator Brown's enlistment proposition. On the 11th of February there was a great public meeting in Richm in the Senate on the final passage of the bill, March 7th, 1865, was as follows: YEAs-Messrs. Brown, Burnett, Caperton, Henry, Hunter, Oldham, Semmes, Sims, and Watson--9. NAYs — Mssrs. B
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
ave been one of great toil to both men and horses, as they had marched forty miles through an almost unbroken forest, most of the time under a beating rain, or in the water up to their saddle girths. They bivouacked, after dark, on the borders of a dark and gloomy swamp, and sleeping on the ground, without tents, during the night, they were again drenched with rain. Before daylight of the 9th, they renewed their march, their route leading almost southwest through swamp and wilderness to Brown's ferry, where they crossed to the south side of the Ocmulgee river. The bed of the river was too treacherous and its banks too steep to permit the crossing to be made by swimming, which would have been most expeditious, so the impatient colonel had to use the ferry-boat; and, in his hurry to ferry his command over rapidly, the boat was overloaded, and a plank near the bow sprung loose, causing the boat to leak badly. No means were at hand with which to make repairs, and hence lighter boat
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
report to Governor Henry A. Wise, at Charlestown, Virginia, at which point were being collected the volunteer companies of the State to insure the execution of John Brown and his associates. When the command reached Piedmont station, now Delaplane, on the Manassas Railroad, it fell in with the Mountain Rangers, a cavalry companyecution, while the rest of the command was employed in keeping clear the streets, for it was feared even at the last moment that an attempt would be made to rescue Brown. Upon the return of the command to Warrenton, the ladies of that patriotic town received them graciously, and gave in their honor a handsome ball. So early was the strong and lasting covenant made between the women and the soldiers of the South! The John Brown war, as the people called it, gave an immense impulse to the secession sentiment of Virginia, and when South Carolina seceded and coercion was talked of, the captain of the Black Horse immediately tendered his command to Governo
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First cavalry. (search)
onspicuous and noble part. And at Moorfield, under General Averill, it formed part of the gallant two hundred of the First New York (Lincoln) Cavalry, commanded by Captain Jones, that defeated McCausland's whole brigade, returning from the burning of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. It served under Averill during the memorable advance of General Sheridan against General Early in the Shenandoah Valley, and took part in every battle during the campaign. In the battles of Opequan, Fisher's Hill, Brown's gap, and Wier's cave, the valiant conduct of this company attracted the attention of all who beheld it. And at the battle of Nineveh, when Capeheart's Brigade attacked and defeated McCausland's Division, this company led in the charge. When Sheridan set out from Winchester to join Grant, his way was obstructed by the rebels, under Rosser, at the bridge over North river, near Mount Crawford. The First New York Cavalry, under Lieutenant Colonel Battersby, was ordered to swim the river a
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson and his men. (search)
now Major Jackson better; there is something about him I can't make out. Nobody can; but it wouldn't pay, replied Bath. Old Jack's a character, genius, or just a little crazy, or something of that sort. He lives quietly, and don't meddle with people; but he is as systematic as a multiplication table, and as full of military as an arsenal. Stiff, you see, and never laughs, but kind-hearted as a woman; and, by Jupiter, he teaches a nigger Sunday-school. But, mind what I say, if this John Brown business leads to war, he'll be heard from. Well, it did lead to war, and Jackson was heard from, and Colonel Terrill fell fighting under him. I have referred to Major Jackson's ill-health. It took the form of dyspepsia, and once, during the war, he told me he had suffered with it for twenty years, and he knew of no misery which attacked a man as it did, physically, mentally, and morally, and was as likely to drive one to suicide. It produced in him that simplicity of diet which w
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Stuart in camp and field. (search)
s time, in only one scene attracting public attention. This was in 1859, at Harper's Ferry, where he was directed by General, then Colonel, R. E. Lee to summon John Brown to surrender. He recognized Brown, then passing as Captain Smith, as soon as the engine-house door was half opened, as an old acquaintance in Kansas, and advisBrown, then passing as Captain Smith, as soon as the engine-house door was half opened, as an old acquaintance in Kansas, and advised him to surrender, which Brown declined doing, adding, You know, lieutenant, we are not afraid of bullets, when Stuart stepped aside, and the attack and capture of the old marauder followed. In a sketch so limited as the present, it is impossible to more than refer to the main points in Stuart's career as a soldier. From theBrown declined doing, adding, You know, lieutenant, we are not afraid of bullets, when Stuart stepped aside, and the attack and capture of the old marauder followed. In a sketch so limited as the present, it is impossible to more than refer to the main points in Stuart's career as a soldier. From the first, his cavalry operations were full of fire and vigor, and General J. E. Johnston, under whom he served in the Valley, called him the indefatigable Stuart. He became famous for his gayety, activity, and romantic exploits, and after fighting all day would dance nearly all night at some hospitable house. He wore at this time h
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