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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 1,857 43 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 250 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 242 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 138 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 129 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 126 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 116 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 6 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 89 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John Brown or search for John Brown in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Contents of Thie first volume. (search)
er's Ferry,72 63.Louisville, Ky.--Guthrie's and Dixon's Speeches,72 64.Major Anderson's Official Report,76 65.Maryland--Gov. Hicks' Proclamation. Baltimore--Mayor Brown's Proclamation,76 66.N. Y. Chamber of Commerce.--Resolutions77 67.President Lincoln's Blockade Proclamation,78 68.General Scott's General Orders78 69.The Baltimore Riot,78 70.Baltimore--Mayor Brown to Gov. Andrew, and Reply,80 71.N. Y. 7th Regiment--Departure for Washington,80 72.Massachusetts 8th Regiment — Officers, &c.,81 73.Fort Moultrie--Report in Charleston Courier,82 73 1/2.New York Union Meeting, April 20, 1861,82  Full Reports of Speeches by    Gen. Dix,W. M. Evartstin's Proclamation,119 76. Star of the West, Seizure of,119 77.Gosport Navy Yard, Burning of,119 78.Gen. Scott's Letter to Secretary Floyd,121 79.Baltimore--Mayor Brown's Statement,123 80.Rhode Island Regiment; Gov. Sprague,124 81.Wendell Phillips' Speech, April 22,125 82.Californians--Meeting in New York,131 83.Liverpool T
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Introduction. (search)
the General Government is expressly authorized to suppress. Did any one imagine in 1793, when General Washington called out 15,000 men to suppress the insurrection in the Western counties of Pennsylvania, that if the insurgents had happened to have the control of a majority of the Legislature, and had thus been able to clothe their rebellion with a pretended form of law, that he would have been obliged to disband his troops, and return himself baffled and discomfited to Mount Vernon? If John Brown's raid at Harper's Ferry, instead of being the project of one misguided individual and a dozen and a half deluded followers, had been the organized movement of the States of Ohio and Pennsylvania, do the Seceders hold that the United States would have had no right to protect Virginia, or punish the individuals concerned in her invasion? Do the seceding States really mean, after all, to deny, that if a State law is passed to prevent the rendition of a fugitive slave, the General Government