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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 1,857 43 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 250 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 242 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 138 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 129 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 126 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 116 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 6 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 89 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for John Brown or search for John Brown in all documents.

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on being as characteristic a trait as his genius for battle. In July, 1857, the command of his regiment devolved upon him, and three months later he was called to Arlington on account of the death of his father-inlaw, Mr. Custis. Despite the change in his circumstances, he returned to his command in Texas and remained until the autumn of 1859, when he was given leave to visit his family. It was during this visit that he was ordered with a company of marines to Harper's Ferry to dislodge John Brown. Then, after giving the legislature of Virginia some advice with regard to the organization of the militia, he took command of the Department of Texas. From afar he watched sadly the Lee's boyhood playground When Robert E. Lee came over from Alexandria as a boy, to play soldier in the gardens and grounds around this beautiful mansion overlooking the Potomac, he could hardly have thought of its occupation during his life-time by a hostile force determined to bend his native State to
n W. Turner. One division was sent to the operations against Fort Fisher, and its place was taken by one from the Eighth Army Corps. It was present at the final operations around Petersburg, and the pursuit of Lee. The corps was discontinued August 1, 1865. Major-General Edward Otho Cresap Ord (U. S.M. A. 1839) was born in Cumberland, Maryland, October 18, 1818. He served in the Seminole War and in various Indian expeditions in the far West. In 1859, he took part in the capture of John Brown at Harper's Ferry. As brigadier-general of volunteers, he commanded a brigade in Buell's Division and the First Corps of the Army of the Potomac from October, 1861, to April, 1862, and had a division in the Department of the Rappahannock until June 10th. As major-general of volunteers, he commanded a division in the Army of West Tennessee. Then he assumed conmand of the Thirteenth Army Corps in the Armies of the Tennessee, and of the Gulf; of the Eighteenth Army Corps in the Department