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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 1,857 43 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 250 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 242 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 138 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 129 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 126 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 116 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 6 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 89 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Brown or search for John Brown in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
em, or by escaping carried them to the Federal leaders. He was a well-educated, athletic, handsome young man, and was said to have been a nephew or relative of John Brown. On the morning appointed for his execution I visited him early, and, after conversing and praying with him, proposed to introduce one of the United States chad), and Colonels Trigg and Kelly, both in command of brigades. Honorable mention should also be made of Brigadier-General Humphreys, Benning, Deas, Clayton, Bate, Brown, Robertson and Manigault. For more detailed accounts of the noble deeds performed by our gallant officers and brave soldiers, I refer you to the reports of my juno the Rio Grande to protect our western frontier from the threatened invasion of the Mexicans. The Mexicans began the contest by an attack on Fort Brown, where Major Brown was killed. But the fort held out until succor came. On May 8th the forces under General Taylor, returning from Point Isabel, encountered the Mexicans, led by
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
the Mississippi river, which had been captured in April, 1862. He acknowledged, what had clearly been proven on the trial, that he had enlisted in a Confederate regiment for the purpose of examining and reporting the state of the defences on Island No. 10. He had secretly made full drawings of the fortifications and forwarded them, or by escaping carried them to the Federal leaders. He was a well-educated, athletic, handsome young man, and was said to have been a nephew or relative of John Brown. On the morning appointed for his execution I visited him early, and, after conversing and praying with him, proposed to introduce one of the United States chaplains, of whom several were then in Libby prison, to be with him in his last hours. I obtained permission and authority from General Winder and brought to his cell one of those chaplains. I remained in the hall to bid him farewell, and when I took his hand he said to me: You have been very kind to me, and I thank you for it. I ha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
the enemy's position at Chatanooga. I desire to mention the following named officers as distinguished for conduct and ability, viz: Major-Generals Hoods, Buckner, Hindman and Stewart; Brigadier-Generals B. R. Johnson, Preston, Law, (respectively in command of division), Kershaw, Patton, Anderson, Gracie, McNair), (severely wounded), and Colonels Trigg and Kelly, both in command of brigades. Honorable mention should also be made of Brigadier-General Humphreys, Benning, Deas, Clayton, Bate, Brown, Robertson and Manigault. For more detailed accounts of the noble deeds performed by our gallant officers and brave soldiers, I refer you to the reports of my junior officers. The steady good conduct throughout the long conflict of the subordinate officers and men which the limits of this report will not permit me to particularize, is worthy of the highest praise and admiration. I am greatly indebted to Lieutenant-Colonel Sorrel, Assistant Adjutant-General, Lieutenant-Colonel Manning,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
ed ability until 1840, when he resigned. After his resignation he repaired to his plantation in Brazoria county, Texas, and was made happy by the admission of Texas, in 1845, to a place as one of the independent and sovereign States of the American Union. On the admission of Texas into the Union, General Z. Taylor was ordered to the Rio Grande to protect our western frontier from the threatened invasion of the Mexicans. The Mexicans began the contest by an attack on Fort Brown, where Major Brown was killed. But the fort held out until succor came. On May 8th the forces under General Taylor, returning from Point Isabel, encountered the Mexicans, led by General Ampudia, on the plain of Palo Alto and defeated them, with a loss of nine killed and forty-four wounded men. The loss of the Mexicans, 600 men. On the next day, the 9th, was fought the battle of Resaca de la Palma, when 6,000 Mexicans were defeated with a loss of 1,000 men. American loss, 110. Under the call for volunteer
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
illery); J. R. Johnson's (Bedford Artillery); D'Aquin's (Louisiana Guard Artillery); Dement's (First Maryland Artillery); Brown's (Second Maryland Artillery); Balthis's (Staunton Artillery); Pleasants's (Manchester Artillery)—(7). On Longstreet'sn's (Dixie Artillery), with Featherston's Brigade—(3). Attached to G. T. Anderson's Brigade, (D. R. Jones's Division). Brown's (Wise Artillery)—(1). Attached to Evans's Brigade.—Boyce's South Carolina Battery (Macbeth Artillery)—(1). Attachllery)—(3). There came up, after Second Manassas, from Richmond— Of the Reserve Artillery, five or six companies of Brown's First Virginia Regiment—Dance's (Powhatan Artillery); Hupp's (Salem Artillery); Macon's (Richmond Fayette Artillery); Wbling's and Bondurant's, which had been sent to the rear; but he includes, apparently, in this number, three companies of Brown's regiment (Wyatt's, Ritter's, and Young's), left at Richmond. If this be so, he had but seve
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 50 (search)
Mississippi included) who had remained with the wounded. The prisoner of the most importance taken from the enemy, and the first prisoner of war I had ever seen, was one Major Vodges. On returning from the Island, and while the machinery of one of our tow-boats was out of order, several of our men were wounded by small arms fired from the enemy on the Island, among them, General Anderson, who was shot in the arm. The bombardment of the 22d and 23d of November, 1861, was commenced by Colonel Brown, commanding Fort Pickens, and in about one-half hour afterwards, responded to by our entire line of fortifications. The enemy's land fortifications were aided by the two large men-of-war, the Richmond and Niagara, commanded by flag-officer McKean. 'Twas said by the enemy that the damage done to Fort Pickens was slight, whilst they with their hot shot and shell set fire to several houses at the Navy Yard, silenced several of our land batteries, and came near demolishing Fort McRea. Be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
ed to the wind, by their rude log huts in the wilderness, there also the vine clambered, and the rose and lily bloomed. In 1749, near Greeneville, in Augusta county—and Augusta county was then an empire stretching from the Blue Ridge mountains to the Mississippi river—in 1749, Robert Alexander, a Scotch-Irish immigrant, who was a Master of Arts of Trinity College, Dublin, established there The Augusta Academy—the first classical school in the Valley of Virginia. Under his successor, Rev. John Brown, the academy was first moved to Old Providence, and again to New Providence church, and just before the Revolution, for a third time, to Mount Pleasant, near Fairfield, in the new county of Rockbridge. In 1776, as the revolutionary fires were kindling, there came to its head as principal William Graham, of worthy memory, who had been a class-mate and special friend of Harry Lee at Princeton College; and at the first meeting of the trustees after the battle of Lexington, while Harry L<