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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 1,857 43 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 250 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 242 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 138 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 129 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 126 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 116 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 6 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 89 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Brown or search for John Brown in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The story of the Arkansas. (search)
ut and strike us as we passed. One of them, the Lancaster, was slowly moving across our path, and I heard Brady ask Captain Brown if he should cut that boat in two. The Captain returned an affirmative answer, and the game pilot steadied our ship n as they reached the air. But that gave us no rest. The shot struck upon our sides as fast as sledge-hammer blows. Captain Brown was twice knocked off the platform stunned, his marine glass was broken in his hand, and he received a wound on his tnd the great commander, have been ignored by the sect which ruled the navy, but when the history of our corps is written, Brown will rank first. Some one called out that the colors had been shot away. It reached the ear of Midshipman Dabney M. Scales, and in an instant the glorious fellow scrambled up the ladder past Captain Brown, and fearlessly treading the terrible path of death, which was being swept by a hurricane of shot and shell, deliberately bent on the colors again, knotted the hal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Brigadier-General E. W. Pettus of operations at Lookout Mountain. (search)
Report of Brigadier-General E. W. Pettus of operations at Lookout Mountain. headquarters Pettus's brigade, camp near Dalton, Ga., December 6, 1863. Sir,—At half-past 12 o'clock on the 24th ultimo I was with my command on the top of Lookout Mountain, and was then ordered by Brigadier-General Brown, commanding Stevenson's division, to report, with three regiments of my command, to Brigadier-General Jackson, commanding at the Craven House. I moved at once with the Twentieth, Thirty-first and Forty-sixth Alabama regiments, and at the head of the column I found Brigadier-General Jackson at the point where the road to the Craven House leaves the road leading down the mountain. Communicating my orders, I was directed to hasten forward and reinforce Brigadier-General Moore at the Craven House. On the way I met squads of Moore's and Walthall's brigades; and when about three hundred yards from the Craven House I found that that point had been carried by the enemy. The two brig
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the Eclectic history of the United States a proper book to use in our schools? (search)
a solemn compact between the inhabitants of the Territory * * * and the people of the thirteen States. The next sentences (p. 268) contain the only allusion to John Brown in the text, and are as follows: The excitement became greater when John Brown, formerly of Kansas, actually invaded the State of Virginia with a party of aboutJohn Brown, formerly of Kansas, actually invaded the State of Virginia with a party of about twenty men, for the purpose of liberating slaves. He gained possession of the arsenal at Harper's Ferry, thinking to arm the negroes, whom he expected to join him. He was easily captured—his party being either killed or dispersed—and was tried, convicted, and put to death under the laws of Virginia. Invaded the State of Virgi of Booth and his accomplices invading Washington, and attacking President Lincoln and Secretary Seward. They are murderers. Contrast with this description of John Brown the following, on page 276, which the author adopts from Mr. Lincoln's inaugural address: He threw upon the politicians of the South the whole responsibility
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
nia: University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, May, 3, 1884. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society . Dear Sir,—In the January and February (double) number of the South-Ern Historical Society papers is published Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia, August 31, 1864. Corrections earnestly solicited if errors are found. I do not see the papers, not being a subscriber. This number was kindly lent me by Mrs. Gorgas. In the Artillery of Second corps, Brown's battalion, Colonel J. T. Brown. Powhatan Artillery, Captain W. J. Dance, &c., &c. Colonel John Thompson Brown (having been for more than a year previously in command of a division, consisting of two or more batteries, Colonel Thomas H. Carter being in command of the other division of the Artillery of the Second corps), was killed in the battle of the Wilderness May 4th, 1864. Major David Watson, of the same battalion, technically First Regiment Virginia Light Artillery, was killed on th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the, Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
ead of Bibles-or the outrages committed by the Abolition party of Kansas. 2. The friends of the book think that it (p. 268) tells the truth when it says that John Brown had no support in his raid, and that therefore the rage of resentment through the South was uncalled for. We would advise them to read up on this question, and they will find that in the Senate of Massachusetts a motion to adjourn on the day of John Brown's execution in respect to his memory was lost by only three votes—that town bells were tolled, funeral sermons preached, and eulogies pronounced all over the North—that John Brown at once took his place in the pantheon of Abolition sainJohn Brown at once took his place in the pantheon of Abolition saints—and that the resentment of the South was justly aroused, not against this mad fanatic, but against his supporters, whose vanguard he led in invading the South to free the negroes whom their Fathers had sold to our Fathers, quietly pocketing the money, and only discovering the crime of slavery after they had reaped its full bene<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A sketch of Debray's Twenty-Sixth regiment of Texas cavalry. (search)
bray's regiment was definitely constituted with its full complement of young, robust, enthusiastic, well-mounted, welldisciplined, and drilled volunteers, when the order was received to prepare to march to the State of Mississippi and report to General Van Dorn. The prospect of entering into service in the field, gladly hailed, was soon darkened by disappointment. The report of the fall of New Orleans caused the destination of the regiment to be changed, and it was ordered to proceed, with Brown's battalion of cavalry, to re-enforce General Sibley in Arizona and New Mexico. This duty, by no means pleasant, as it entailed a march of about one thousand miles, over a country mostly deserted, sterile, and with long waterless stretches, was entered upon, if not cheerfully, at least with becoming soldierly fortitude. The regiment was on the march when the report was received that General Sibley, confronted by a largely superior force, and short of supplies, was falling back on San Anton