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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 1,857 43 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 250 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 242 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 138 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 129 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 126 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 116 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 6 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 89 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for John Brown or search for John Brown in all documents.

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and of white desperadoes, who are supposed to be Republican emissaries, employed to destroy the town. The object, it is said, cannot be plunder, for quite a number of valuable articles have been picked up, which were scattered about in carrying the furniture out of different houses, and in every instance they have been returned to their owners by both white and black. There is not the slightest suspicion of the slaves. The fire companies of Charlotte are composed principally of slaves, having regular uniform; and had it not been for their untiring labors and noble conduct, the whites would have been almost homeless. All those colored people who are not members of companies are so terrified that they seem afraid to leave their owners, for fear something terrible will happen to them. It is thus that unoffending communities of the South are harassed and imperilled, simply for peaceably endeavoring to extricate themselves from the "glorious Union" with the John Brown Government.