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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 1,857 43 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 250 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 242 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 138 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 129 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 126 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 116 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 6 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 89 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for John Brown or search for John Brown in all documents.

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overnment of limited powers, deriving its powers from the people. He thought the Union or the Constitution did not impair our State rights, his views being the same as those of Madison, Jay and Hamilton. His speech was well received throughout, and he took his seat amid great applause. Dr. J. T. Hays was then called for, who made a brilliant speech of fifteen minutes--portrayed the policy of the Black Republican party, the past as well as the present; could see no difference between John Brown and Lincoln, except that one represented and led on a small force, the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley,